2014 Vine Growers Yearbook & Buyers Guide 2nd Edition

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "2014 Vine Growers Yearbook & Buyers Guide 2nd Edition"

Transcription

1 2014 Vine Growers Yearbook & Buyers Guide 2nd Edition

2

3 Editorial Contributors: Joanna Wood Malcolm Withnall Chris Cooper Duncan McNeill Geoff Taylor Advertising Manager: Sophia Wright Publisher: John R. Jarrett CONTENTS 2014 Overview 4 Statistics 12 Hattingley Visit 17 Dates for your Diary 22 Kits Coty Visit 23 Sprayers 26 Association Contacts 28 Campden BRI Report 29 Trellising 33 The Vine Growers Yearbook is published annually by Book Review 38 Machinery 39 LION HOUSE, CHURCH STREET MAIDSTONE, KENT ME14 1EN TEL: FAX: BUYERS GUIDE Products & Services 47 Address & Contacts 52 The Vine Growers Yearbook and its contents are the copyright of ACT Publishing. I.S.S.N. No Annual subscription Although every effort is made to ensure the accuracy and reliability of material published, the publishers and their agents can accept no responsibility for claims or opinions expressed by contributors, manufacturers or advertisers Cover picture: Dornfelder grapes at Brightwell Vineyard, Oxfordshire. Vine Growers Yearbook 3

4 2014 OVERVIEW English wine Facing the future by Joanna Wood Since the start of the post WWII renaissance in growing vines in England and Wales there has never been such an exciting time to be involved in viticulture. Probably the last five years have seen the greatest changes. Very large plantings have been made or are planned by major investors setting up highly professional projects in southern England almost exclusively to produce sparkling wine using Champagne varieties. In last year s first Vine Growers Year Book an overview of the last few decades of the development of the viticultural industry in the UK identified the many changes that have brought us to the present position so this year it is opportune to look to the future. We are arguably at a turning point and as many in the industry will know, marketing expert Mike Paul and Peter Gladwin, owner of Nutbourne Vineyard, have launched a private initiative to explore what common goals could unite everybody and enable the development of a long term vision and strategy for the English wine industry. Much of this overview is based on their presentations to UKVA regional AGMs during the first part of As Peter Gladwin admits, when he planted twenty five years ago English wine was considered quaint, similar to the village fête or even something to be laughed at. Now according to Mike Paul, the luxury brand image of English wine with scarcity value and premium prices leaves wine trade players scratching their heads and asking how did this happen? Media interest is enormous with frequent articles appearing in national newspapers and news items on television. We need to recognise just how very special Mike Paul, marketing expert and Peter Gladwin, owner of Nutbourne Vineyard hope to encourage development of a long term vision and strategy for the English wine industry 4 Vine Growers Yearbook

5

6 2014 OVERVIEW the achievement is says Mike Paul. At present we can sell all we can produce the main issue is supply not meeting demand caused in the main by the vagaries of the weather. However what is the long term potential of Brand English Wine? The Challenge for the English Wine Industry The first challenge is to work out a way to allow large and small producers, growers and brands to all work together for the common good. The superb reputation which English wine has established over a comparatively short time should be nurtured, protected and grown. Much of the success so far can be traced back to hero brands established by people like the Mosses at Nyetimber, the Roberts family at Ridgeview and the Lindo family at Camel Valley. According to Mike Paul, the average price for still wines is around 10 to 12 per bottle and for sparkling wine 23 per bottle. Overall production at present is about one million bottles per year. By 2025 volumes could be ten to fifteen times those of today but what everyone wants to avoid is a drop in price. The central challenge is: How to ramp up volumes significantly while at least maintaining pricing at its current level. Our Strengths and Weaknesses The strength of having a luxury brand attracting a premium price driven by scarcity value is terrific while it lasts but is often only appreciated after it has gone. The high level of media interest is also an asset. The excellent generic promotion coming from Julia Trustram Eve at English Wine Producers (EWP) including events like English Wine Week and the efforts of individual vineyards are all helping to keep this going. A recent development which has also helped with publicity comes from the new major investors who are pouring money into professional wellfunded marketing programmes with good results. The concern for everyone is that maintaining the price of a luxury brand is more difficult to do as volume goes up since this often leads to the premium going down in proportion. The premium price position of English wine, both table and sparkling wine, is going to need ongoing investment of the right kind. There are some glaring weaknesses which need to be taken into account in developing a strategy for the future. The major one is that there is poor quality wine (mostly table wine but some sparkling) out there being sold at over inflated prices which is letting the side down. The customer has no discernible way to tell the difference. Amateurism and naivety are to blame as of course no one sets out to produce a bad wine. Bench marking product in the wine trade would help a lot. Wines that need to compete within the wine trade with wines from all over the world (the UK imports wine form 30 countries) would be exposed to much tougher scrutiny. Wines that are sold from the cellar door have a false value for what s in the bottle as the customer is buying into the whole vineyard visit experience. Mike Paul considers that the production/marketing orientation is out of balance. Most start-up producers are much more focused on their production than finding a market for their wines. Many in the industry are passionate about growing and making great wine but have little knowledge or interest in marketing. Despite EWP there is a lack of funding/commitment to generic promotion which could be addressed by having a strategy. The tensions that are sometimes evident between the UK Vineyards Association (UKVA), EWP and regional bodies is a weakness which countries with more of an 6 Vine Growers Yearbook

7

8 2014 OVERVIEW export focus can overcome more easily. Togetherness is something that Australian wine producers were able to achieve by seeing themselves as Australia against the world. The English wine community is very diverse. For example, East Anglian vine growers are mostly grape farmers selling their crop to wineries, whereas Thames and Chiltern have a high proportion of small growers and the South East Vineyards Association (SEVA) is seen as full of professional vineyards. A serious problem is that we lack comprehensive information on plantings by variety. Nationally collected statistics by the Wine Standards Board (WSB) are often at least a year out of date and also only general statistics on the type of wine being produced is collected. This is not the case in other countries where it is recognised how vital it is to know exactly where you are in order to plan ahead. Despite the statutory need to provide the WSB with returns once a vineyard starts producing, this requirement is not being enforced and it is estimated that only 40% to 50% of eligible vineyards are filling in the admittedly irritating forms and submitting a return. The Opportunities and Threats We ve only scratched the surface says Mike Paul when describing the potential in the UK market. A report on sparkling wine consumption in the UK produced by Wine Intelligence for WineSkills predicts that the impressive growth trajectory will continue for several years. The relative youth and affluence of sparkling wine drinkers is encouraging. According to a September 2012 survey, 44% of UK adults drink sparkling wine and 66% drink it at least once a month. Remarkably one in five sparkling wine drinkers, or four million people, claim to be drinking English sparkling wine at least once a month. The potential internationally has already led to good sales and should be greatly encouraged by the fantastic interest shown in English wine at the ProWein trade show both this year and last. Englishness adds value. It will be important to maintain the scarcity value even as volume builds. Here we can learn a lesson from the New Zealand industry. With the UK as their only major market in 2008 and a surplus of supply, prices inevitably suffered. Now they have established many markets around the world and are much less vulnerable in the future. The UK industry has the scope to expand for some time before the scarcity value is eroded, as long as distribution and the profile keeps growing alongside production. The lack of regulation at present in this country in comparison with other wine producing countries in Europe means that we have a New World ethos. There are no restrictions on planting/production and therefore this can lead to product innovation. However the lack of regulation is also a threat as there is no effective regulation of quality that the whole industry adheres to. There is still too much sub-standard wine being produced which lets down the whole English brand. It is even possible to import wine from abroad (carrying out secondary fermentation in this country) and then call it Product of England. The big fear is that if we have a high production year due to favourable weather, there is the potential to move from scarcity to over supply relatively quickly which could have a negative impact on prices and margins. We must learn from the Australians and New Zealanders who found to their cost how quickly a wine region can move from high demand to over supply leading to discounting to protect volumes. All it takes is one cracking 8 Vine Growers Yearbook

9 2014 OVERVIEW vintage of still wine in the UK. There is less danger from sparkling wine due to the lag before it is ready but no room for complacency. Ideas on the actions required. The suggestions which Mike Paul and Peter Gladwell have formulated following the SWOT analysis above have been presented at meetings around the country but there is still time to add views and make comments. There will need to be a proper discussion of their recommendations. The overriding recommendation is that it would be highly beneficial to agree a long term vision for the industry, with clear generic objectives and thoughts on the best way for these to be achieved. Just as individual businesses will all have a long term plan and a strategy so should the UK viticulture industry. Centrally it is vital to protect the brand and enhance quality. The pros and cons of regulation in order to do this need consideration but this course of action is the most emotive and it is assumed that most people oppose it. The value of the WineSkills initiative in the last few years to provide training opportunities for all at hugely discounted costs is unarguable. However, its co-ordinator Jo Cowderoy has to apply for funding from DEFRA annually and there is no long term guarantee that applications for government funding will continue to be successful. More expertise on the practical side and for business marketing is needed. A Training and Development Plan needs establishing with at least a five year plan in place. There are already several organisations making up the governance of the industry. What are the pros and cons of rationalisation? Stephen Skelton estimates that there are 656 vineyards in the UK but his Jo Cowderoy, coordinator of the WineSkills initiative, currently oversees the finance and adminstration of the project and organises Workshops and Masterclasses. best guess is that UKVA membership represents only 50% of the 1,500ha of vines known to be planted. Do we need to increase funding of generic development and the protection of Brand England? This is where a Trade Mark scheme might provide funding and mean that all serious players would want to buy into it. It is still important that individual and generic marketing work hand in hand. Is England, like other countries, going to develop smaller sub-regions with individual wine styles? If so wouldn t it be advisable to establish a generic vision to realise their full potential? In all this there must be consumer benefit. We should establish accurately the extent and varietal mix of current plantings in order to model possible supply/demand scenarios. Across the world they know exactly what is planted and a detailed database here would be immensely valuable in order to facilitate future supply/demand management. The Vine Growers Yearbook 9

10 2014 OVERVIEW concerns of individual businesses about giving away too much information to competitors means that there needs to be a neutral, trusted, central collection body to carry this out. A good example from UK horticulture is the trade body for top fruit, English Apples and Pears Ltd which collects detailed national sales and production figures and uses them to keep multiple retailers on their toes and help individual marketing companies to make the most of the opportunities and threats each season brings. Discussion so far and next steps Mike and Peter admit that they have only talked to activists so far, those who are members of regional associations within UKVA who attended their most recent AGMs. Inevitably this means that they will have missed a lot of people but they stress that it is not too late to be involved and they welcome more views of their analysis and proposals. Mike and Peter s addresses appear in the footnote below.* Although there were some negative comments from the regions which is hardly surprising considering the diverse nature of the industry and its history so far, Mike and Peter were encouraged and perhaps surprised by how positively their initiative has been received so far. The next step is for the two-man team to put together a short two page report summarising their recommendations to UKVA/EWP/Regional Chairs. After this the plan is to establish a properly constituted and representative working party to develop a long term vision and strategy for English Wine. Brand English Wine is something very special but most threats to it come from within the industry although this also means that they are controllable. It is important to establish if there is broad agreement and if this is the case, a long term vision and strategy is both achievable and necessary. * addresses: It is estimated that there are 656 vineyards in the UK. Vine Growers Yearbook 10

11 Stay In Touch For a free trial of The Fruit Grower magazine call us on or Lion House, Church Street Maidstone, Kent ME14 1EN Tel: +44 (0) Fax: +44 (0)

12 STATS & PRODUCTION Industry statistics and production information by Joanna Wood nformation is power is an oft-used Isaying in business. Since 1989 when surveys became compulsory and more recently when the Wine Standards arm of the Food Standards Agency (FSA) became responsible for the Vineyard Register in the UK, there have been records of all vineyards known to its Inspectors. However, many people who plant vineyards are unaware that they should register. The leading Wine Standards Board (WSB) Inspector, Graham Finch, based in Kent, points out that it s a legal requirement to register any vineyard over 0.1ha in size with the FSA within six months of planting. But he admits that many new vineyard owners claim they don t know they need to register and so they only appear in the statistics when the vineyard starts producing grapes, typically three years after planting. WSB figures are inevitably lagging behind the actual planting figures. Additionally the requirement to send a return is not being enforced and it is estimated that only 40% to 50% of eligible vineyards are filling in the WSB forms and submitting a return. In the UK, annual harvest and production declarations are part of the Vineyard Register, with vineyard and total production data published by European Commission Eurostats. The overall production figures are provided to the European Commission. According to the FSA website; we compile reports on vineyard data at the start of each wine marketing year in August. For wine year , there are currently 448 commercial vineyards in England and Wales. In addition there are 89 vineyards The main vine varieties grown have changed considerably in the last five years to those suitable for producing sparkling wine, led by the classic varieties Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. The longer established white varieties Bacchus, Seyval Blanc and Reichensteiner are mainly used for still wine (Source: Wine Standards Branch of the FSA) 12 Vine Growers Yearbook

13 STATS & PRODUCTION Table 1 details the changes in area and fortunes of the industry during the last twenty five years. The figures show the decline in new plantings and the effects of grubbing in the late 1990s and early 2000 s followed by the recent dramatic revival. which are classified as hobby vineyards as their production is not sold or recorded. The total area including hobby vineyards is 1,520 hectares. Commercial vineyards are sub-divided into growers without wine making facilities and 131 wineries which make wine from their own production and from grapes processed under contract or bought from other vineyards locally or from further afield. Vineyards are mostly situated in South East England (approx 880 hectares in Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Surrey, Kent, and Sussex), and the South West (Cornwall, Devon, Dorset, Somerset, Wiltshire and Gloucestershire approx 202 hectares) with others in East Anglia, the Midlands and a few further north and in Wales. The most northerly commercial vineyard is Yorkshire Heart Vineyard, near York, and the most southerly are in the Channel Islands. Hobby vineyards stretch as far north as the Isle of Lewis, Scotland. A full list of commercial vineyards is available on the FSA website. For the most up to date figures many in the industry turn to Stephen Skelton Vine Growers Yearbook 13

14 STATS & PRODUCTION respected consultant, author and Master of Wine with many years of experience of UK viticulture. According to Stephen the current hectarage under vines is nearer 2,072ha with 1,762ha in production. The largest single vineyard at present is the Denbies Wine Estate, Dorking, Surrey with 106ha (265 acres) and the largest estate spread over sites in West Sussex and Hampshire is Nyetimber with approximately 177ha. The Rathfinny Estate, Alfriston, Sussex planted 20 hectares in 2012 and a further 20 hectares in The intention is to have 160 hectares (400 acres) of vines planted by 2020, eventually expecting to be producing over a million bottles of sparkling wine a year from just this one vineyard estate. The 2010 harvest marked the first time sparkling wine production exceeded still. The styles of wines produced from UK vineyards are approximately 50% sparkling, 38% still white and 12% red/rosé. English Wine Producers (EWP) has a membership of 24 vineyards which represent over 75% of England s total wine production. They state that sparkling wine fermented in bottle will become the dominant sector as most of the new plantings are for sparkling wine production (the classic Champagne grapes, Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier account for nearly 50% of total varietal plantings, see Table 2). In the last 15 years English sparkling wines have won 8 Trophies for Best International Sparkling Wine and 4 Trophies for Best Sparkling Rosé in Global Competitions no other country has achieved this! Based on plantings over the last 5 years, EWP estimate that by 2015 with all the new plantings, production in excess of 5 million bottles of English sparkling wine (one eighth of the volume of Champagne imports) will be possible, giving the industry a forecast retail sales value of nearly 100 million. By 2015 English sparkling wine sales will equate to more than 70% of the imports of Australian sparkling wine. Wine Standards figures for average yields show that production volumes vary quite widely from year to year due mostly to variable weather conditions. It is perhaps surprising that these figures are often ignored by new entrants a case of hope triumphing over experience! It will be vital for the industry to raise the average figures in future in order to remain viable. With the new plantings beginning to come into crop and favourable weather for at least part of the growing season in 2013 the total production figure of 33,384 hectolitres gives some idea of the potential to come in the next ten years. However, good years are a rarity; the variability in crop size is demonstrated by plotting 14 Vine Growers Yearbook

15 STATS & PRODUCTION [Sparking wine/total bottles] Source: Stephen Skelton MW notable big production years: large harvests only occurred in 2010, 2006, 1996 and It is true that the newer plantings are more likely to be placed on the very best sites and soils and this combined with improving knowledge of rootstocks and clones for UK conditions will help improve consistency of cropping, but bad spring/summer weather conditions such as 2011 and 2012 will inevitably cause low yields and can affect wine quality too. Thankfully, this is the area where the skills of the highly qualified and experienced wine makers now working in UK wineries pay dividends. With all the new plantings already in the ground and if the weather is favourable, the UK production is projected by EWP to rise to 5 million bottles by In world wine market terms, a production of 3 million bottles represents just 0.02%. For comparison, New Zealand produces 3% of the world s wine. Projecting forward to 2025 using assumptions based on recent experience with UK sparkling wine production, Vine Growers Yearbook 15

16 STATS & PRODUCTION Stephen Skelton suggests production could reach over 10 million bottles. This figure assumes a 10% increase in planting per year; that the present trend will lead to 60% of the planted area being for sparkling and a yield of 25hectolitres per hectare. Although Stephen considers this to be a fairly low figure by international standards, it is higher than the average of 20.29hl/ha. Stephen says Of course there are many factors which could blow these projections off course either way. Two questions inevitably arise: is it too late to jump on the sparkling wine band wagon and is there any future for still wine in the UK? Stephen Skelton summarises the position in his excellent recent publication Vine Growing in Great Britain. There are some good reasons for planting varieties to produce still wines, but one needs to understand the production and marketing problems associated with UK grown still wines before taking that decision. On balance the tide has already turned against still wines and going forward the very much larger area of vines for sparkling wine already planted and known to be in the pipeline, confirms that sparkling wine will be the dominant UK product over the next decade or so and the one likely to garner most press and public attention. Mike Roberts from Ridgeview and Chairman of EWP, speaking at the UKVA AGM this year, suggested that the spilt would become 90:10 in favour of sparkling by 2020 but Stephen Skelton is reluctant to agree. 16 Vine Growers Yearbook

17 HATTINGLEY VALLEY Hattingley Valley A New Business Model for English Wine by Joanna Wood There is something of a pattern developing in the recent explosion of interest in planting vines in England. Financially savvy people with a City of London background are buying land and investing in vineyards with a view to producing English bubbly. Retired hedge fund manager, Mark Driver at Rathfinny Estate in East Sussex is the best known but in a quiet corner of Hampshire, City corporate lawyer Simon Robinson has been developing an innovative business model for English wine at Hattingley Valley. Some vineyard projects in the past have veered too much towards vanity leading in some cases to vineyards being placed in unsuitable sites just so the owner could see the vines from his country house. Others only developed the winery as an afterthought and many did not start with a robust business plan or marketing strategy. Unsurprisingly, many of these vineyards are on the list of those grubbed in the last decade. Simon Robinson s innovative approach has been to create a thriving business, which includes offering the highest quality wine making facilities as both a contract wine maker and to partner vineyards. He has planted the vineyard on a good site two miles from the winery and is establishing a luxury brand for his own Hattingley Valley sparkling wines. Also, by his own admission, he s having a lot of fun and has brought together a team of highly trained, hardworking, enthusiastic young vineyard and wine making specialists. Simon s business model for his sparkling wine is akin to that in France s Champagne region, with some fruit coming from his own vineyards, and other fruit being bought in from more than a dozen growers, mostly from across southern England. Hattingley now works with 16 partner vineyards from across the South of England ranging from Buckinghamshire, Kent to Dorset and some recent large local plantings in Hampshire. As Simon points out this helps spread the weather risks like frost that can threaten yields. The Hattingley Valley vineyard team of (l-r) Jim Bowerman, Simon Robinson, Romain Henrion and Simon Checketts. Hattingley Valley Vineyard The 7.3 hectare site was planted with vines in the spring of The south facing downland slope has the chalk and flint bedrock similar to that of the Champagne region. The site overlooks the valley where the Watercress steam Vine Growers Yearbook 17

18 HATTINGLEY VALLEY The south facing downland slope has the chalky, flinty bedrock similar to that of Epernay in the Champagne region. railway runs between the Hampshire market towns of New Alresford and Alton. Initially 22,000 vines of the three principal champagne varieties of Chardonnay, Meunier and Pinot Noir were planted by specialist planter Ernst Weiss using the latest laser-guided planting technology. Simon enjoys telling the following story; It even managed to cope with a bomb crater left by Ernst s countrymen over 60 years ago! The following year a nursery was established with 3,000 vines of Chenin Blanc and Pinot Gris allowing for experimentation with different varieties and root stocks to discover first-hand what works best for Hattingley Valley. Simon is the first to admit that the Chenin Blanc was a case of owner s folly and will probably be taken out. Most recently in May 2011, another 10,500 vines were planted with equal quantities of Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, Pinot Meunier and Bacchus. This makes the vineyard currently amongst the top thirty largest UK grape growers and there is scope for expansion. At present 76% of the vineyard is planted with Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. The vines are planted with 1.4 metre spacing and a row width of 2.2 metres using the Guyot trellis system. Wide rows are considered important to reduce problems with these disease prone varieties. Also a thin canopy copmbined with deleafing to encourage airflow and allow grapes to dry off in autumn are important vineyard practises. The aim is to consistently produce yields of 8 t/ha when vines are 5 to 10 years old. Admittedly this is much less than average yields in Champagne - 12t/ha is expected - but the plantings are more intensive there. The main site vineyard is expected to produce 50 tonnes at maturity. Experienced viticulturalist, Jim Bowerman, joined the Hattingley Valley team of Simon Robinson, Simon Checketts, general manager and wine maker Emma Rice, as vineyard manager in January With 15 years in the industry, Jim s viticultural knowledge and expertise in trellis design and canopy management has been gained in the Napa Valley, Southern France as well as the UK. Following a work placement at Hattingley Valley in 2012, Romain Henrion returned after completing his Masters in Oenology in France to take the post of associate vigneron. Romain s remit is to manage Hattingley Valley and partner vineyards to achieve the highest quality grapes and to provide technical support and advice to supplier vineyards. The vineyard team are proud of their measured environmentally-sensitive approach. For example, they use the latest 18 Vine Growers Yearbook

19 HATTINGLEY VALLEY tunnel spray technology thereby recycling over 70% of the spray used and reducing spray drift to a minimum. 20% less fungicide sprays were used in 2013 compared with the wet 2012 as there was less disease pressure. All the vineyard processes: pruning, bud rubbing and canopy management are carefully balanced with SO4 root systems to achieve the best vine and fruit quality. The delicate soil structure is protected by avoiding running machines on wet earth. Vine prunings are burnt on site in the traditional manner in order to keep the pruners hand s warm and also in keeping with tradition, a rose is planted at the end of each row to forecast mildew problems. Meticulous record keeping and experimentation are central to the success of the team. Keeping tight records of each batch of grapes and following it through the wine making process means that they will be able to look back, adapt and apply the knowledge to make improvements each year. Bunch thinning after bunch closure and before veraison, termed green harvest by Romain, has been trialled with 30% of bunches furthest from the trunk removed. The aim is to achieve higher sugars as there is a redirection of resources, reduction in acidity and no loss The Smart vine-covers crop covering system aims to produce better quality grapes and heavy yield. of yield. It should be noted that more than 30% bunch thinning does reduce yield so this is not for the faint hearted or inexperienced! The addition of a product called Sugar Mover combined with green harvest gave encouraging results on Chardonnay clone 76 in Romain reported results from this trial at the SEVA AGM in April 2014 as well as a trial applied to ten rows of Pinot Noir using the Smart vine-covers cloche system designed by the flying vine doctor Richard Vine Growers Yearbook 19

20 HATTINGLEY VALLEY Smart. Improving the microclimate around the flowers and then the developing fruit to produce better quality grapes and heavier yields is the aim. The un-replicated trial at Hattingley with clone 777, which has ripeness problems, compared using the covers from bud burst to harvest or from bud burst to flowering. There were improvements in sugars and reductions in acidity but Botrytis was encouraged. This occurred even though the covers were removed for spraying which is inevitably a very labour intensive process. The trial will be repeated next year but so far experience suggests that disadvantages outweigh advantages except in years with very poor conditions during flowering as was experienced in Wield Yard Winery The 800 plus square metre winery facility in Lower Wield was built on the site of some disused hen houses which had become an eyesore on the village edge. The quality of the build, with maximum use of the brick and knapped flint seen in vernacular buildings in the Hampshire downland landscape in which it sits, is spectacular. Planners and locals must be delighted with the result but as Simon lives just around the corner, he didn t want to be known locally as the bloke who put up those horrid buildings! Constructed in a traditional Hampshire courtyard design, the winery has solar roof panels generating as much electricity as they can use and efficient waste treatment ensures that despite the absence of mains drainage the only effluent released into the local environment is water. The building houses some of the very best equipment from continental Europe. The Coquard PAI Press from Epernay with a Chief Wine maker Emma Rice with The Coquard PAI Press. capacity of up to 4,000 kg, is widely recognised as one of the ultimate in sparkling wine presses. A smaller Magnum Oenoconcept press designed for sparkling/champagne production by Oenoconcept is ideal for smaller consignments of grapes. They are very proud of their custom-made individually thermo-regulated tanks of varying capacities (1,000-6,000 litres) and in-line nitrogen and carbon-dioxide for oxygen management which enables them to ferment each batch perfectly. Chief wine maker, Emma Rice boasts an impressive CV in winemaking. An early graduate of Plumpton College s BSc in Viticulture and Oenology achieved whilst working for Nyetimber Vineyard in Sussex, she went on to become an oenologist for Cuvaison Estate Wines in the Napa Valley, California. This was followed by cool climate experience in Tasmania before returning to establish a wine analysis laboratory (Custom Crush now based at Hattingley) and winemaking consultancy. A key element of the house style championed by Emma is 20 Vine Growers Yearbook

21 HATTINGLEY VALLEY Hattingley Valley s winery is set up to offer contract winemaking services to growers across the South of England. the subtle use of oak barrels to ferment a small proportion of the wines each year as well as ageing on lees in stainless steel tanks. This helps to soften the wines before they go into bottles for the second fermentation. Besides providing the ideal space for making Hattingley Valley s own sparkling wine, the winery is set up to offer contract winemaking services to growers across the South of England. The experienced team turns contract grapes into sparkling, still white, red and rosé wines. They undertake all the usual functions of a winery: fermentation in tank or barrel, ageing, malolactic fermentation, blending, riddling, disgorging, bottling and labelling. Additionally, advice is available for planting, new site development, growing issues and grape analysis. The Hattingley Valley brand Establishing a premium brand is key to successful marketing and the Hattingley Valley distinctive black and orange livery with the wines signature silver-washed fritillary butterfly symbol was in place before a bottle was produced. The use of a rare orange butterfly found in the landscapes where the vines grow emphasizes terroir and environmentally friendly production. As they say, It echoes our ethos: an uncommon, exquisite local creation. Although not open to the public on a daily basis, Hattingley do cater for group tours with an eye on the growing interest in vineyard tourism. The tasting room and barn facility offers a corporate and private function venue with a difference. Wines can be bought via their own website and a growing list of stockists listed there. Interest internationally is very encouraging, particularly following two years of attendance at the ProWein trade fair on Tel: Vine Growers Yearbook 21

22 HATTINGLEY VALLEY the English Wine Producers stand. Late August 2013 saw the press and trade launch at the winery of the first commercial releases. Simon and team decided that their 2011 Classic Cuvée was more ready for release than the The 2011 vintage saw a record breaking hot September/October meaning the fruit ripened wonderfully. The wine is a blend of all three classic varieties with Chardonnay dominating at 71%. 25% of the total blend was fermented and aged in old Burgundy barrels. This gentle oak flavour adds an extra layer of complexity to the crisp apple fruit of the wine. Priced at per bottle, the tasting notes explain that the 8 months on lees before tirage and 12 months on lees in the bottle gives the wine a lovely delicate toasty character. No Dates for your Diary FRUIT FOCUS July 23rd 2014 East Malling, Kent. ME19 6BJ NATIONAL FRUIT SHOW October 15th + 16th 2014 Maidstone, Kent. ME14 3JF VINITECH December 2nd 4th 2014 Bordeaux, France PROWEIN March 15th 17th 2015 Düsseldorf, Germany. malolactic fermentation on this wine ensures the zesty acidity shines through, and is perfectly balanced by the dosage. In January 2014 the first sparkling rosé was launched. The 2011 Rosé is a carefully selected blend of three varieties, Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir and Pinot Noir Précoce, a small proportion of this wine was fermented in barrel before being blended to create the delicate pale pink colour. Sponsorship of Polo events, involvement in vintage car rallies (Simon has quite a collection of cars) and an annual charity Open Day attracting enthusiastic local attendance are all marketing gold for this developing luxury brand. SITEVI November 24th 26th 2015 Montpellier, France. INTERNATIONAL COOL CLIMATE WINE SYMPOSIUM May 25th 27th 2016 Hilton Metropole, Brighton. DRINKTEC September 11th 15th 2017 Munich, Germany. Confirm dates and locations before travelling 22 Vine Growers Yearbook

23 KITS COTY Chapel Down s investment at Kits Coty really coming to fruition by Malcolm Withnall The Chapel Down Winery based at Tenterden is one of the most well-known English wine producing businesses in the UK. Operating under the brand, Chapel Down, this enterprise now sources grapes from 15 sites across the South East of England, including the largest at Kits Coty (100 acres), just north of Maidstone on the Kentish downland on Bluebell Hill. Chapel Down has accumulated a raft of awards over the last decade for both the excellence of their business operations (KEiBA Excellence in Business awards 2013 for a land-based business being the most recent), and innumerable other prestigious international awards for their wines. Ahead of the 2013 harvest, the Vine Growers Yearbook met with Richard Lewis, Vineyard Manager, to review production practices from vineyard to winery. At the heart of our business is the wine maker, and his ability to read each season s potential, A heavy yield of Pinot Noir bodes well for the 2014 harvest, placing it amongst the top varieties grown by Chapel Down. said Richard, a recent Plumpton graduate in Viticulture. Each growing season offers its own harvest potential, from which he will seek to produce the high quality wines for which the company is renowned. Chapel Down is well-known for the quality of its sparkling wines, an attribute that results from site and soil, variety, seasonality and ultimately skilful wine making. Central to that is the development of flavour and aroma compounds, sugars, acidity and ph levels ahead of and through the primary and secondary fermentation, explained Richard. In the vineyard, he uses a refractrometer, monitoring Oeschle levels to identify the optimum harvest date to potentially make the best wines. He will also keep a watchful eye in the October/November period (2013 was marked as a late season) to assess the risk of damaging diseases such as Botrytis and both downy and powdery mildews. We are looking for an Oeschle level of 70-80, which is ideal for sparkling wine varieties, giving fruit potential alcohol levels of %, with the sparkling wine varieties picked first in the harvest sequence, then the still wine varieties after, added Richard. The varieties being grown at Kits Coty are Pinot Noir and Chardonnay (a classic sparkling wine variety), with a new 2013 planting of 25 acres of Bacchus, one of Chapel Down s highest volume sellers. As Richard explained there is great emphasis on clonal selections, matching sites and soils around the various sites, and knowing that the company is likely to expand its Vine Growers Yearbook 23

24 KITS COTY production base, such understanding will contribute enormously to what will be grown where and how in the future. The Kits Coty soils are grey chalk soils, which are a marl overlaying chalk, which is very typical of this Kent downland on the south to south-west facing slopes on Bluebell Hill, he continued. They were initially confirmed as being potentially suitable for vine production by soil expert, Colin Furneaux. We plant at 2.0m row distance, with variable in-row distances according to variety, and use Fercal rootstocks throughout which are known for their lime tolerance. By using over 20 different varietal clones in our 100 acres of vines we seek to place ourselves in the best position for matching future sites and soils with optimum yield and quality. Clonal selections originate in Europe, from the Champagne and Burgundy regions in particular, and offer different characteristics such as berry size, fruit colour and aromatic content to the grape. Richard Lewis believes that these subtle clonal characteristics contribute towards the unique qualities of the Chapel Down wines, which are often identified by their complexity when drunk. It is these complexities that have won the winery international acclaim. We put much effort into analysing these clonal differences, both in the field from an agronomic perspective, and in the winery. We harvest the clones separately (all the vine rows are individually marked), and also press, tank and ferment them separately, so they can be ultimately researched at the drinking stage, said Richard. Sometimes these clonal complexities enable the wine maker to overcome some of the seasonal and site factors that occur in the field, and provide a partial safety net against the vagaries of vineyard management. The vines at Kits Coty are trained and pruned on a double Guyot system, where a number of vertical shoots are trained and retained within a metal post and wiring system. Two carefully selected canes (ripened shoot) are tied horizontally in, following winter pruning. The new vertical shoot growth is held in place by double wires, and will then be selected, pruned and tied into place once again during the following winter. The grape yielding canes and buds are laid down from the previous season, with each cane carrying 8-10 buds. Excess vegetative growth is removed to create a balance between the developing bunches of grapes and the vine s total leaf canopy. We will probably pick around tonnes of grapes in the 2014 harvest at Kits Coty, which would be a very acceptable and pleasing harvest yield, said Richard. Richard Lewis also explained that the vineyard is sprayed to control pests and diseases, with early morning or evening spraying widely favoured at the vineyard, with very little wind to disturb spray patterns. We find spraying conditions are so much better during this time of the day, but we do find late autumn spraying a real challenge, with the dew-laden target often being very slow to dry off, he said. He also commented that they are using a straddle canopy sprayer rig (supplied by David Sayell) that is able to recycle much of the tank mix and gain significant economies whilst accurately target-spraying. Richard Lewis said he embraced the technologies of soil mapping using GPS systems, enabling accurate fertiliser application according to the variable analysis present in the vineyards. Vines can rapidly deplete nutrients on these marl soils, and 24 Vine Growers Yearbook

25 KITS COTY with a heavy crop this year we will be monitoring nutrient levels very closely, said Richard. We also use leaf petiole analysis to monitor nutrient uptake into the vine, taking first samples around the flowering period, and then repeating every 2-3 weeks thereafter. These, and the soil analyses, are collated to provide an accurate picture of how the vines are performing. Chapel Down is supported by vine agronomist Duncan McNeill, who has input throughout the growing season. Nutrition and canopy management require constant assessment, with emphasis on some of the micro-nutrients like Iron, Magnesium and Manganese, and a strategy of adjustment throughout each growing season, said Richard. It is these details that contribute towards a quality grape that produces quality wines. Vines are grown relatively herbicide-free, with a single spring applied Glyphosate, followed by mechanical soil tillaging to maintain a weed-free soil surface using an NP Seymour soil tilling rig often seen on organic fruit farms. We find a tilled soil surface allows better soil conservation, capturing summer rainfalls on our sloped vineyard sites, and contributing towards better soil care overall whilst offering some cost saving benefits, he added. Chapel Down are determined to pull together all the right technologies and practices that contribute towards high quality wine making through paying attention to detail. A key element of their agronomy is clonal selection to match sites, soils and varieties, a strategy that will certainly be the foundation of their future plantings. Vine Growers Yearbook 25

26 SPRAYERS Removal of grandfather rights for sprayer operators by Chris Cooper Many newcomers to growing vines without horticultural or agricultural training are in danger of falling foul of the legislation and rules accompanying the application of pesticides. (The term pesticide includes products described as herbicides, fungicides and insecticides). Keeping up to date with changes in the relevant legislation is vital and most growers will be able to rely on their product supplier for help but ignorance is no defence. The UKVA s Full and Label Extension Approvals (known as the Green Book) is published annually and lists all approved materials. It is free to UKVA members, 30 to non-members. Its author Chris Cooper gives advice below on recent changes that vine growers need to be aware of due to the Sustainable Use Directive (SUD). Since July 2012 the Sustainable Use Directive (SUD) has gradually become implemented in the UK, the direct consequences of these regulations on vineyard operations over the next few years are covered in this article. Grandfather rights, which allowed anyone born before to use professional plant protection products on their own or their employers land without having to gain a formal qualification of competence, will be illegal from under the SUD. This means that City & Guilds in consultation with various farming bodies (chiefly the NFU) have developed a Safe Use of Pesticides course to replace Grandfather rights with a formal qualification. The course has been available since November 2013 and details of the courses and topics covered can be found on the National Proficiency Training Council (www.nptc.org.uk). The qualification is a one-off assessment and the certificate has no expiry date, however the qualification is specific to the individual and their place of work so spray operators who attain the certificate cannot supervise trainees and can only spray their own land or that of their employers. Keeping up to date with changes allows growers to maintain safe production methods. Many vineyard spray operators have undertaken the existing level 2 Safe Use of Pesticides qualification for air-assisted sprayers and/or hydraulic sprayers, which allows the individual to undertake contract work if desired (and insured) as well as the option of supervising trainees learning how to use spray equipment. The high rate of successful spray operator training in the vineyard sector is predominantly down to WineSkills which was a UKVA initiative and is now funded by DEFRA, based at 26 Vine Growers Yearbook

27 SPRAYERS Plumpton College and co-ordinated by Jo Cowderoy. Jo organised the Level 1& 2 courses when the UKVA were involved, DEFRA are now in charge of funding and my understanding is they are not keen on following through on this training, but I believe the topic is still under discussion between Jo & DEFRA, so for the last 18 months the subsidised courses have been unavailable via WineSkills. On the plus side many people have already completed the courses and passed the exams. The Government consultation SUD response document referring to sprayer operator training states that: This system will widen the UK s existing training and certification scheme to include currently exempt groups and will cover initial and on going training. The implication being that spray operators will need to become registered with the National Register of Spray Operators (NRoSO) by 2016, otherwise their certificate of competence may be frozen or revoked until further training has been undertaken. To remain registered on the scheme at present 30 points need to be accrued over 3 years; the UKVA has gone a long way to satisfy this requirement as both their journal The Grape Press and The Pesticides Manual are registered for points with NRoSO. Points can also be gained by attendance at relevant WineSkills courses, agricultural merchants spray operators road show training courses and events such as Fruit Focus, therefore there should not be a problem of remaining on the register. Mandatory testing for sprayer machines The SUD requires that all sprayer machines* undertake and pass a sprayer MOT by 2016; this includes back-up sprayers that might be used in emergencies. After 2016 the sprayer MOT is required once in 5 years until 2020 thereafter a minimum of every three years, newly purchased sprayers are required to undertake an MOT within 5 years of purchase. The MOT s are generally carried out by the company that supplied the sprayer. However, if it was purchased second-hand visit the National Sprayer Testing Scheme (NSTS) website which will give details of the nearest test centre/company or contact them direct. In many ways the vineyard industry is different to the more typical horticultural sectors in the UK that are producing fresh (*with the exception of handheld and knapsack sprayers) Vine Growers Yearbook 27

28 SPRAYERS products like fruit, salads and vegetables. Admittedly it does have a quality wine scheme (but this doesn t cover grape production methods) but like other sectors of horticulture where the product is processed before consumption, e.g. cider apples and hops, there is at present no farm assurance scheme. Hence there is no requirement for annual sprayer MOT s, Crop Protection Management Plans or third party records inspections to name but a few differences. It is important to note that the SUD will restrict supply companies from selling to any grower (or their representative) professional plant protection products unless a holder of a recognised certificate of competence is known to work at that vineyard. For most arable & horticultural crops this is a standard requirement of their farm assurance scheme but if a certificate cannot be produced to satisfy the supply company it would be in breach of the SUD to supply the vineyard. If the grower did manage to obtain a product and it was used on their vines they would be in breach of the SUD. The last time I checked, this can result in a maximum 20k fine if the case was heard in the Magistrates Court or an unlimited fine plus imprisonment if the case went to the Crown Court. UKVA & Regional Associations Contact Information The United Kingdom Vineyard Association Robert Cowley Regional Associations: East Anglian Vineyards Association Chairman: Guy Howard Mercian Vineyards Association Chairman: Shaun Merrick South East Vineyards Association Chairman: Christopher Foss Welsh Vineyards Association Chairman: Richard Morris South West Vineyards Association Chairman: Sam Lindo Thames & Chilterns Vineyards Associations Chairman: Bob Nielsen Wessex Vineyards Association Chairman: Tim Ingram Hill 28 Vine Growers Yearbook

29 CAMPDEN BRI Some technical questions answered by Geoff Taylor Since I began working in the UK wine industry in 1988, I have tested, advised on and assessed many tens of thousands of UK produced wines. I ve also been very closely involved in the various wine schemes including the EVA Seal of Quality to Quality/Regional Wines and now the PDO/PGI schemes. It s been a pleasure to witness how the UK industry has developed. The industry is expanding, but many new recruits lack a scientific background. From the questions I am asked over and over by clients, it s clear that there are certain technical areas which are still poorly understood by many. To help both those new to the industry and those struggling to get their heads around the science, I ve written this article Geoff Taylor, Head of Campden BRI s Wines and Spirits Department. on three key subject areas protein stability, chill stability and copper. While the article is not all encompassing, it covers some of the areas most pertinent to producing wines in the UK. The degorgement process (part of Campden BRI s riddling facility). Vine Growers Yearbook 1. Protein stability Certain unstable wine proteins can produce a cloudy haze in wine. While it is a problem for both white and red wines, in red wine much of the protein is naturally removed because tanin binds with protein. Haze makes the wine unsuitable for sale so it s crucial to remove these unstable proteins prior to bottling. There are various protein stability tests. Some use heat to force the protein out of solution and produce a haze others are chemical based, for example trichloroacetate or bentotest. Some of the tests, such as those that involve heating wine for six hours, are so harsh that many 29

30 CAMPDEN BRI stable wines would fail them. The result of using such harsh tests is over fining wine, which in my opinion makes the wine less attractive. The aim is to take out the potentially unstable proteins and nothing more. The challenge is that there is no guaranteed test that will predict if proteins proteins repel one another. Many processes performed on the wine matrix (solution) can alter the solubility of proteins and would thereby invalidate any previous predictive test. The results in the table below show it is crucial to only test the wine when all the treatments prior to bottling have been completed. Start point Process Result stable wine filtered stable or unstable wine stable wine sweetened stable or unstable wine blending stable wine + stable wine stable or unstable wine stable wine + unstable wine stable or unstable wine unstable wine + unstable wine stable or unstable wine stable wine cold stabilised stable or unstable wine will form in a bottle. This challenge is further exacerbated by the wide range of UK grape varieties. Little is known about their varied protein structures and sadly some of the more aromatic varieties - Bacchus, Schonburger, Siegerrebe and Phoenix - seem to have the most challenging protein stability issues. Fining agents are often used to remove unstable proteins from wine, which works because the negatively charged finings bond to the unstable positively charged proteins, allowing you to remove them from the wine. Proteins are least soluble at their isoelectric point, which is the ph point where all the positive and negative charges are equal. At this point proteins easily precipitate even without fining agents. Both below and above the isoelectric point (isoelectric ph) the protein will become soluble. If the wine ph is higher than the isoelectric point of some of the proteins it contains, the proteins become negatively charged and it becomes very difficult to stabilise wines using classical fining agents because the negatively charged finings and 2. Copper The copper levels in wines from many countries have been increasing steadily during the last 10 years or so; UK wines are no exception. The copper can come from grape treatment residues, fittings in tanks or pumps and from the recent increased use of copper-based products to facilitate the State of the art GC/MS/MS which can quantify nanogram/litre levels of taints and contaminants. 30 Vine Growers Yearbook

31 CAMPDEN BRI Bottling/Storage Result 25cl glass bottles stored upright crystals within 3 months 75cl glass bottles - stored upright crystals within 9 months 75cl glass bottles - laying flat stable after 12 months 1.5 litre glass bottles stored upright stable after 12 months 25cl plastic bottles stored upright stable after 12 months removal of reductive odours. There is a legal maximum level for copper of 1mg/l and there is also a recommended maximum for wine stability so it s crucial to know the level of copper in your wine prior to bottling. For decades, the wine stability maximum guideline was 0.5 mg/l, however, recent work by the Australian Wine Research Institute (AWRI) and other oenological laboratories has shown copper can become instable at levels above 0.3 mg/l. It would therefore be prudent to regard 0.3 mg/l as the new recommended maximum. Copper haze, or casse as it used to be called, can be very similar to a protein haze in appearance. However, copper does not precipitate or haze per se - it forms a complex, frequently with protein, tannin, phosphate or occasionally other material in the wine. So, if a haze or sediment has been identified as a copper protein complex, it s not always easy to determine whether high levels of copper or unstable proteins are to blame. These two instability issues are very frequently inter-related and some of our most attractive aromatic varieties seem to be particularly prone to these problems. 3. Chill stability The result of bottling a potentially chill unstable wine is crystal formation in the bottle. The crystals are harmless, but potentially render the wine unfit for sale. The crystals may be one of three forms: potassium hydrogen tartrate calcium tartrate (less common but still quite common in the UK due to our high calcium levels) calcium oxalate (quite rare and not yet seen in the UK). In my opinion, this is technically the most problematic and troublesome issue in the world of wine. It was a problem when I joined the wine industry in 1976 and continues to be. Wines from the UK have had their fair share of chill stability Vine Growers Yearbook 31

32 CAMPDEN BRI Sulphur dioxide analysis by Aspiration method. problems, but with the rapid growth of bulk shipments to the UK, the major UK bottlers have problems with wines from both hemispheres. Each year we hear that chill stability problems have led to over 100,000 cases of wine either being recalled, discorged or retreated. It s a tragedy. The problem in many ways is similar to the protein instability issue they both lack an absolute instability prediction test and the wine can be rendered instable by further treatment. Filtration is the worst offender for causing chill instability issues because it can filter out protective colloids, which inhibit crystallation. We are frequently asked to arbitrate in situations where a pre shipment analysis from a lab in the country of origin has shown the wine to be chill stable, but the wine throws a crystallation deposit after bottling in the UK. So what went wrong and whose fault is it? It could be argued that you should use a very robust, predictive test such as freeze thaw or solubility equations. But many stable wines in the market place would fail these tests and neither take account of the filtration conundrum. Filtration changes the wine matrix and if you change the matrix you change the solubility. I could write pages on this subject but I will leave you with some interesting results from an experiment we conducted where the same borderline unstable wine was bottled and stored in different conditions. The results show that it is not just pure chemistry that affects whether the wine is stable or unstable - physics plays a part too. To find out more about Campden BRI s wine quality and troubleshooting services, or for details on our wide range of other services, including analytical, consultancy and sparkling wine, please contact me on or visit 32 Vine Growers Yearbook

33 VINEYARD TRELLIS SYSTEMS Vineyard trellising and crop environment improvement by Malcolm Withnall Whilst the joys of vine growing involve selecting a growing system, choosing the varieties to be grown and acquiring the skills to produce high quality table wines, the selection of a vineyard trellis system remains a key decision in investing in wine production. With 25,000 per hectare a muchcited level of establishment cost ( 10,000 per acre) without rabbit or deer-proofing, vine growers and their advisers have gained much experience setting up vineyards in the UK over many decades. Trellising has to satisfy several key criteria. It has to: Stay fit for purpose over the life of a vineyard i.e. 25 years or more Carry ever-increasing tonnages of grapes per hectare Endure/withstand lively wind speeds as the crop weight increases in the autumn period (especially around the Autumn Equinox) Expose and hold the plant in adequate sunlight to develop its full potential throughout the growing season As with any post and wire system it is the portion of the vertical support below ground that is particularly important. Wooden tree stakes (often chestnut and preserved for longevity) have been mostly superseded by steel and concrete as the main supporters of trellised vines. These offer improved tension, stronger With more than 30 years experience in the vineyard trade, ArcelorMittal has become the market leader within Europe for vineyard wire and accessories WireSolutions ArcelorMittal Sheffield, Birley Vale Close, Sheffield, S12 2DB T , F Vine Growers Yearbook 33

34 VINEYARD TRELLIS SYSTEMS Platypus, along with other companies such as Gripple, supply superb anchoring systems for vineyard trellises. anchoring systems, and greater durability and ease-of-use. Considerable detail is superbly presented in Stephen Skelton s Wine Growing in Great Britain, and this can be used as a template for any research, coupled with trade show and vineyard visits. However some conclusions can be drawn from recent experience. Trellising consists of Posts (end and intermediate) Anchors Wires Fittings and attachments Individual vine canes and attachments to establish the vines in the formative years Possibly the greatest change that has occurred in recent decades is the loss of the land-based artisans who can actually install the trellis systems. The hugely diminished agricultural workforce has left vine and top fruit growers bereft of skill. Fortunately however contract services are available. For instance, Kent s Mike Terry and former Plumpton graduates James Dodson and D Arcy Gander at Vine Works, both have fine reputations, and are widely used. Supply consultants like Gripple and An illustration of the Smart vine-cover system. 34 Vine Growers Yearbook

35

36 VINEYARD TRELLIS SYSTEMS By reducing Bortrytis risk and improving leaf sugars, grape quality can be significantly improved from the veraison stage of development. Platypus to name a couple, have gained great experience from cross-over investments in the soft and tree fruit sectors, and technical advisers/agronomists like Julian Searle at Agrovista are ready to step forward to steer growers in the right direction when it comes to vineyard installations. There is no lack of know-how in the UK industry today, with decision making mostly associated with the capital resources available and timeliness of operations. Experience recognises that where cost cutting or a lack of understanding of trellising requirements has prevailed, sometimes disaster follows as support systems collapse over time. Reparation costs down the line far outweigh the extra cost of getting it right in the first place. The evolution of wooden stakes (especially in fruit tree growing regions) has seen the loss of traditional preservatives, and the loss of indigenous supplies with significant importation of cheaper European alternatives to match changed growing systems, and the substitution with steel and concrete alternatives. ArcelorMittal and the Hadley Group for instance have websites that are worth looking at (as do all companies referred to in this article). They offer a range of post heights to match the canopy design selected by the grower. Hadley even offer coloured posts to appeal to those seeking either to camouflage their plantations, or to make a bold fashion statement! In addition, operational costs around trellis establishment have been reduced considerably as new tools and techniques have been adopted. Gripple for instance are very experienced with steel, concrete or wooden support systems, and their wire-tensioning systems and Torque tensioning tool are widely used. Recognising that the end posts need to be of a more robust specification, the selection of straining systems is paramount. Platypus, Gripple and Fenox all offer excellent anchoring systems, and enjoy well-earned reputations across the industry. As with most products in agriculture, there is a range of specification and cost. In addition to the orthodox trellis kit there are a number of fittings that can be added to vineyards. Spreaders, end-hooks, chains, and indeed crop improvers (e.g. Smart vine-covers) can supplement the basic training or catch wires. Chains facilitate wire tensioning, and yoke spreaders provide a double wire. The spreader is attached to the intermediate 36 Vine Growers Yearbook

37 VINEYARD TRELLIS SYSTEMS posts within the trellis system enabling an easy-to-manage tucking in system as the vines grow. An essential fitting to any multi-row system is an identification tag (an essential ID for spray operators and harvest teams). Agriculture has long since developed cattle ear tags, the female portion only of which is ideal for end row marking. Daltons Supertags are one of the leaders in this field. Vine covers Worthy of inclusion in this area of viticulture is the emergence of vine-covers to enhance vineyard performance. Following in the footsteps of berry and cherry growers in the UK, the vagaries of the UK s weather can cause havoc with high output vineyard performances. The response of these other two major fruit commodities is to provide environmental enhancement i.e. crop covers. They have revolutionised the berry industry, are rapidly emerging to reshape the cherry sector, and could be at the cusp of change for viticulturists. A leader in this field is textile manufacturer Capatex (www.capatex.com) who have developed a 400mm transparent film Smart vine cover. This offers wind protection, an enhanced microclimate and Botrytis suppression, to protect against some of the agronomic factors that can depress vine yield. When placed either side of the fruit zone, this cover protects the developing grapes and leaves, with two-thirds of the shoot length protruding through the gaps in the sheets. Such an investment may be selective in its use, choosing at risk parts of a vineyard as a priority. Capatex recommend putting the covers in place around bud break in mid-april until the shoots are around 50cm long, mitigating frost risk and promoting earlier growth for an earlier harvest. The largest yield increases are likely when used around flowering, when cap-fall and pollen tube growth enhancement can be achieved, but the vine covers can also be used at late veraison to harvest stage, keeping rain from the fruit, reducing Botrytis losses and enhancing sugar by keeping the lower leaves warmer whilst reducing acidity. Where 2.3 metre row spacing is used, the capital cost is around 3,300 per acre, and if the film has to be moved (say 3 times/season) an additional cost of around 400 per acre is incurred. Trial data is expected. An amortised cost suggests an increase of yield of 0.9t/acre (grapes valued at 1,500/tonne) will bring the investment to break-even. With reduced disease losses added in there is the potential to easily exceed this. Capetex suggest a 4 year lifespan, although this could be significantly improved with black, winter covering. The system includes a monofilament wire with two pairs secured at the end posts and held with a double-hooked bungee cable. The Smart cover system can be used with a range of growing systems, including the widely adopted Guyot system. Vine Growers Yearbook 37

38 BOOK REVIEW Review of Wine Growing in Great Britain There can be no such thing as an adequate peer review having read through Stephen Skelton s masterpiece entitled Wine Growing in Great Britain. Your reviewer is but a humble fruit grower, yet curiously possessing similar attributes to the author of this superb publication, as the agronomies of these two fruit crops are remarkably similar. For an emerging sector of British Horticulture to have such a publication available is a testimony to Stephen s total mastery of his subject. He is a Master of Wine, the highest accolade afforded to anyone working in this discipline, and this clearly shows on every page of this book. For those seeking to learn more of the detailed aspects of wine production, this manual (my word, not his) is an essential purchase (www.lulu.com). It is a complete and comprehensive compendium of all there is to know about wine growing in the UK from A to Z and beyond. The author is to be congratulated on making available an encyclopaedic text that should be found on the bookshelf of everyone involved in this industry. On 191 detailed, double-columned pages, packed with information, no stone is left unturned in setting out the full width and breadth of viticulture practices. It is breath taking in its comprehensiveness. For the reader of such a publication there are however a few challenges. It is a huge tome to read, with tight text of a fairly small font size. The author would have perhaps been served better by a greater use of shorter paragraphs and bullet points, lists, tables and charts to enable easier dipping in and out of specific subjects listed in the Contents. In the modern world of printing technology, and given the retail value placed upon the publication, it should also, in my view, have embraced colour photographs, especially in a horticultural practice that is so highly photogenic. The photographic material could also have been more varied in dimensions, rather than restricting itself to one-column width. None of this detracts however from the amazing content of this world-class publication. It deserves to be read by all growers of wine in the UK. I suspect it will become a classic. Reviewer: Malcolm Withnall (Master apple grower) 38 Vine Growers Yearbook

39 MACHINERY FOR VINEYARDS Machinery for Vineyards in the UK by Duncan McNeill Duncan McNeill has overseen the planting & establishment of hundreds of acres of vines. He now provides vine growing consultancy to some of England s largest vineyards whilst also contract farming in Essex and Kent. The range of machinery available to vine growers is very wide, and can be daunting to the uninitiated. This article aims to give an overview of the basic essentials for new entrants, and also to inform growers of some new and innovative equipment that has recently become available in the UK. Getting Started I work as a vineyard management contractor, and have sourced all of the basic essential equipment necessary to provide my service, as well as a growing selection of carefully selected specialised machinery. Perhaps the most important lesson I have learned, is that rather than to purchase cheaper machinery from abroad, it is better to find a UK based dealer who will provide good after sales service. In respect to farm management practices, the following four golden rules apply from day 1, when establishing a new vineyard: 1. Prepare the soil properly before plantation 2. Control weeds 3. Ensure adequate soil moisture for the young vines 4. Protect from infection by powdery and downy mildew These golden rules dictate the types of Vine Growers Yearbook 39

40 VINEYARD TRELLIS SYSTEMS machinery that will be required from the first year of plantation onwards. Machinery For Soil Preparation Correct soil preparation means loose soil down to a depth of 40 50cm, so that the young vine is freely able to produce new roots in it s first season. Roots can only penetrate the soil if they are able to exert greater force than the resistance they meet from the soil. Studies have shown that where soil bulk densities are low enough, roots can penetrate out as far as the centre of the inter-row alley in the first season. The bulk density of a soil (measured in grams / cm³) becomes lighter when there is a greater proportion of air in the soil profile. This is one reason why well aerated soil is necessary for good vine establishment it significantly encourages new root growth in the early years of establishment. Soils with Spading machine service provided by FGS Agri. Tractor forward speed of 1.5mph. high bulk densities resulting from low air content will drastically curtail root production as a result of oxygen restriction and waterlogging. The conventional practice of soil preparation when planting perennial fruit crops is to use a sub-soiler followed by furrow plough in late autumn. The land is Essential Recommended Optional Year 1 Tractor Soil cultivator: Fungicide sprayer Power harrow Herbicide sprayer Disk harrow Water bowser (on hire Spring time harrow to water in new plants Rotavator in case of dry weather) Flail mower Seed spreader (for autumn sewn grass or cover crop) Tractor link box or trailer Forklift / loader Year 2 Wagtail type fertiliser Side mounted disk weeding Compost spreader (with 1 x short implement spreader & 1 x long spout) Year 3 Leaf canopy trimmer Sub soiler plough Picking train (tractor mounted or hand held) Picking containers Flatbed trailer for grape transport Leaf plucking machine 40 Vine Growers Yearbook

41 VINEYARD TRELLIS SYSTEMS then left over winter, to be broken down by the freeze / thaw action of winter frosts. During a mild winter (eg 2013/14) the lack of frosts resulted in little or no frost tilth being created, and a subsequent poor breakdown of the ploughed soils in many cases. The machine that has overcome this problem is a spading machine. This machine is commonly used for preparing new vineyards in continental Europe, and has now been introduced to the UK by FGS Agri. The spading machine can be used in the spring, and is most effective when the ground has been sub soiled initially. There is still a requirement for a final pass with a power harrow, where soils have a high clay content. Close up of a spading machine. Well aerated soil is necessary for good vine establishment. Machinery Requirements From Planting Through To Establishment The table on the previous page (page 40) is intended as a guideline as to the essential and recommended items to be purchased over the first three years of establishment. Vine Growers Yearbook 41

42 MACHINERY FOR VINEYARDS Spreading the investments over a three year period may be favourable to many growers. Year 1 - Essential Start Up Kit All too often new vineyard owners leave it until after plantation to start purchasing machinery. It is of upmost importance that the basic kit is on site before the vines arrive, and is ready to start work immediately. Grapevines often need to be watered in straight after plantation, herbicide is likely to be required a month after plantation, and the first fungicides will need to be applied as soon as leaves are unfurled (or have grown up out of the guards). It is a common myth that grapevines do not need to be sprayed with fungicides in the first season. This is absolutely incorrect. Young vines are very susceptible to powdery mildew, and failure to spray crop protection products in the first season is almost certain to result in infection. When one considers the cost of purchasing vines and installing a vineyard, it is surely unthinkable not to protect that investment from disease in its early years. Rear hydraulic spool valves to power machinery mounted on the rear three-point linkage. Tractors A reliable tractor is the most important piece of machinery that you will purchase for 42 Carbon filters are fitted into the roof. Electrical controls operated from inside the cab. A side mounted hydraulic block to power machinery mounted between the front and back wheels, or machinery-mounted on to the front of the tractor. the vineyard. A broken down tractor means that all other tractor powered machinery is redundant until the tractor is operational again. It is therefore the machine that needs the greatest consideration. Being prepared to spend a little more money on a sound Vine Growers Yearbook

43 MACHINERY FOR VINEYARDS A Landini 75hp tractor sourced and supplied to order by Vineyard Solutions. tractor will save time and money on running repairs later on. Most vines in the UK are sprayed with at least sulphur, and a range of other fungicides in many cases applied using airblast sprayers. Therefore a tractor with a closed, fully sealable cabin, fitted with carbon filters is strongly recommended. Oil Flow Requirements: There are is a wide range of tractor mounted vineyard equipment, which use hydraulic rams for movement and hydraulic motors for power (eg leaf canopy trimmer) most of which are run off the tractor s hydraulic pump. Growers anticipating using such machinery should be aware of the hydraulic oil flow rate that their tractor can generate. Flow requirements for modern tractors using hydraulic power steering in tandem with tractor mounted equipment would be in the region of Litres per minute. It is also important to be aware of the number of hydraulic spool valves you are likely to need, and where these are positioned on the tractor. Hydraulic spool valves are used to supply oil from the tractor, via a hydraulic hose, to power machinery that is mounted onto the back, front or side of the tractor. There a number of UK based dealers of good quality new and used vineyard / orchard tractors, including NP Seymour, Kent Tractors, Richard Burton Specialised Machinery, Vitifruit Equipment and Vineyard Solutions amongst others. Rear mounted Link Box: This has been extremely useful for carrying trellising materials, compost, tools, grape trays. At under 200, it has been a cheap alternative to a quad bike & trailer, and is often used for carrying out miscellaneous jobs. A trailer or transport container of one sort or another is essential. Fertiliser Spreader Perhaps the best value item of machinery that I have purchased is a 500 second hand wagtail type fertiliser spreader. The rear spout needs to be cut down to A wagtail type fertiliser spreader, purchashed secondhand. approximately 6 inches (dependent on row width), which enables the fertiliser to be spread in an undervine strip instead of broadcast across the alleys. I use this for spreading nitrogen in the spring and avoid feeding the grass / weeds in the alley by depositing the fertiliser in the undervine Vine Growers Yearbook 43

44 MACHINERY FOR VINEYARDS 44 Chardonnay vines in Surrey after treatment with the disc weeder. A side mounted disc weeder. herbicide strip only. The engine needs to be run at low revs, so that the wagtail spout moves more slowly, otherwise the fertiliser would be thrown too far. To spread in rows of varying width, simply raise or lower the spreader on the rear link arms. The cut down spout can then be interchanged with a full length spout for use when broadcast spreading other fertilisers such as phosphate, potash or spreading grass seed. Side Mounted Disk Weeder This tool is best operated at tractor speeds of 8 10 mph, thus enabling large areas to be treated in a short time. Up to 20 acres can be covered in a day with a double sided machine. It works by the angled, serated disk cutting into and crumbling up the earth in the undervine strip. It is effective in all soil types except heavy boulder clay. Experience has shown that best results are achieved when disking is carried out prior to a dry spell, as this prevents rerooting of weeds. The machine works best at a depth of 5 10cm in the soil, and does not come into contact with the vine trunks at all. There have been no problems experienced with sucker shoots forming scion roots. I have found a combination of one or two well timed herbicide applications, and the additional use of the disk weeder provides excellent control of weeds in the undervine strip. The use of the disk weeder has undoubtedly reduced the need for at least one herbicide application per season. There are three main manufacturers of the disk weeder, all German and all available via UK distributors. They are Braun, Wilfried Rust and Clemens. Machine Harvester Grape harvesting machines are widely used across vineyards in continental Europe and the new world. A very small number are currently in use in the UK, partly due to the high proportion of grapes being hand picked for sparkling wine production. A machine harvester can pick up to 35 tonnes of fruit during a working day. To hand pick this amount in the UK would require up to between workers, so there are significant savings to be made over the lifespan of the machine! If it is possible to use the machine harvester for more than one seasonal task, then the investment in such a machine Vine Growers Yearbook

45 MACHINERY FOR VINEYARDS becomes more viable. The practice of minimal pruning is becoming more popular in a number of European wine regions, due to the huge reduction in cost of producing grapes, and the reduction in levels of botrytis bunch rot at harvest. Where machined crop thinning is practiced, the berries undergo a physiological reaction, resulting in a thicker skin which improves resistance to splitting and subsequent botrytis. Bunches of grapes become less compacted, and the berries are smaller. The result is an increased ratio of skin:pulp, which has been shown to improve aroma and flavour of still white and red wines. Compost Spreaders As we search ways to farm in a more sustainable manner, the use of green waste compost as an alternative to inorganic fertiliser is being taken up by more and more growers. Not only rich in potash, phosphorus and a range of trace elements, compost improves soil structure, organic matter levels and water holding capacity. McNeill Vineyard Management Ltd spreads compost using a spreader of simple and robust design. Inside the trailer a pair of augers move compost to the rear of the hopper where it falls onto spinning disks to be broadcast spread, or applied in a row out of one side of the trailer. Look for versatility in a machine harvester: this one is carrying out crop thinning Tow & Blow Frost Fans One of the biggest barriers to the expansion of vineyard acreage in the UK is the risk of spring frosts, which kill off early shoot growth and can cause crop wipeout for the season, as well as vine death in young plants. The critical time window in UK vineyards is from early April until the end of May. Until now the best method of avoiding spring frost has been through site selection ie, to plant vineyards where there is the lowest risk of spring frost occurring. This is generally on sloping sites which allow cold air Vine Growers Yearbook 45

46 MACHINERY FOR VINEYARDS Left bunch: A non-thinned vine. Right bunch: A vine which has been thinned by machine harvester at the growth stage known as peppercorn sized berries (BBCH stage 73). to drain away, and (not or!) sites within close proximity to the sea or river estuaries. This precludes significant areas of land in the UK which would otherwise be favourable for viticulture, if a reliable means of frost fighting were available. This is now no longer the case thanks to a New Zealand developed frost fan, called the Tow & Blow. It has been used with great success on fruit orchards and vineyards in New Zealand, Australia, Chile, Canada, the USA - and is now available to growers in the UK. A tractor; utility vehicle or truck can tow the 1.2t (trailer mounted) frost fan into Broadcast spreading compost at a rate of 50t / Ha on a vineyard site prior to plantation. This machine can be used in vineyard rows as narrow as 2 metres. position, where four adjustable legs stabilize it. Hydraulics lift an 8 meter high boom. On the end of the boom a 17kW V-twin Honda engine drives a 2m eight blade impeller. This oscillates to circulate air for frost protection over approximately 4 Ha. Tow & Blow requires no concrete foundations, no planning permission, no requirement to remove trees or vines for installation and is extremely quiet. Independent noise analysts in New Zealand recorded only decibels at a distance of 300 meters. It is stationary whilst working, and does not need to be towed around the vineyard during operation. The Tow and Blow will use only five litres of fuel per hour, versus a requirement of fifty litres for a stationary wind machine. The level of performance of the Tow and Blow has been made possible because an impeller encased in a bell mouthed shroud or duct is used rather than an open fan. The shroud enables the impeller to act like a turbofan or vortex, increasing the velocity of air exiting the fan. In addition, the use of straightening vanes fitted to the exit side of the impeller take the spiral out of the airflow which reduces turbulence and increases performance. Growers overseas comment on the ease to setup. The machines are mounted on their own trailer and can be parked in a shed when not in use. If different crop types or varieties are sensitive to frost at varying times of the year, the Tow and Blow can be moved from one crop to the other. For more information go to or contact Ed Mitcham of Tow And Blow UK Ltd on Vine Growers Yearbook

47 2014 Buyers Guide Your Buyers Guide starts here... Find addresses and all contact details from page 52 ADVISORY SERVICES A E Chapman & Son Ltd Agrovista UK Ltd John Buchan Agronomy Campden BRI The Food & Environment Research Agency Lansdown Insurance Brokers Quinton Edwards AGRONOMY SUPPORT Agrii HL Hutchinson Ltd ANALYSIS SERVICES Campden BRI FAST LLP ANALYTICAL EQUIPMENT QCL ANCHORING SYSTEMS Platipus Anchors Ltd BARRELS Taransaud Tonnellerie Tonnellerie Rousseau Vicard Tonnelleries BIO STIMULANTS Aston Horticulture Ltd Chase Organics Ltd XL Horticulture Ltd BIRD NETTING Capatex Ltd Lows of Dundee Ltd BOTTLING AJS Labels Core Equipment Ltd CANOPY DE-LEAFING Vitifruit Equipment CAPPING MACHINES Core Equipment Ltd H. Erben Ltd Vigo Ltd CAPSULE SUPPLIER H. Erben Ltd Rankin Brothers & Sons Ltd CLEANING SYSTEMS Amòs Industrie Lamberhurst Engineering Ltd COMPOSTS John Bourne & Co Ltd FGS Organics XL Horticulture Ltd CONTRACT WINE MAKING Hattingley Valley Wines Ltd Litmus Wines CONSULTANTS Amòs Industrie Quinton Edwards CORKING MACHINES Core Equipment Ltd All addresses and contact details from page 52 47

48 2014 Buyers Guide CROP COVERS/MULCHES Capatex Ltd Lows of Dundee Ltd CROP PROTECTION Agrii Agrovista UK Ltd Bayer CropScience Ltd Berthoud Sprayers Ltd Haygrove Ltd HL Hutchinson Ltd Landseer Ltd Scare m Tubex, Fiberweb Geosynthetics CRUSHERS Amòs Industrie Core Equipment Ltd Lamberhurst Engineering Ltd NP Seymour Ltd DE-STEMMERS Amòs Industrie Core Equipment Ltd Lamberhurst Engineering Ltd NP Seymour Ltd DISGORGING BevTech Ltd Core Equipment Ltd Hattingley Valley Wines Ltd ENZYMES & YEAST BevTech Ltd Litmus Wines EQUIPMENT HIRE Stacatruc Ltd FERTILISERS Compo Expert UK Ltd GreenBest Ltd Everris Ltd Hortifeeds LS Systems Ltd Yara UK Ltd FILLING MACHINES BevTech Ltd Clemens GmbH & Co. KG Core Equipment Ltd Vigo Ltd FILTRATION Core Equipment Ltd FOLIAR FEEDS Aston Horticulture Ltd Chase Organics Ltd Everris Ltd Hortifeeds Solufeed Ltd Yara UK Ltd FROST PROTECTION Compo Expert UK Ltd FAST LLP NP Seymour Ltd FUNGICIDES Bayer CropScience Ltd Fargro Ltd Landseer Ltd GLASS BOTTLES A E Chapman & Son Ltd GPS PLANTING Eugen Weis 48 All addresses and contact details from page 52

49 2014 Buyers Guide GRAFTED VINES McNeill Vineyard Management Ltd GRAPE HARVESTERS Lamberhurst Engineering Ltd GRAPEVINES McNeill Vineyard Management Ltd GROUND COVER Capatex Ltd Lows of Dundee Ltd HERBICIDES Bayer CropScience Ltd INSECTICIDES Bayer CropScience Ltd INSURANCE Lansdown Insurance Brokers INTER VINE CULTIVATING Vitifruit Equipment IRRIGATION EQUIPMENT Fieldwater Ltd LS Systems Ltd Netafim UK LABEL APPLICATORS BevTech Ltd Clemens GmbH & Co. KG Core Equipment Ltd Mecamarc Vigo Ltd LABELS AJS Labels Anglia Labels Ltd LABOUR RECRUITMENT/MANAGEMENT Concordia UK Ltd Fruitful Jobs Ltd LIMING John Bourne & Co Ltd MACHINERY & EQUIPMENT Amòs Industrie Richard Burton Specialised Machinery Case IH Agriculture Clemens GmbH & Co. KG Core Equipment Ltd Lamberhurst Engineering Ltd McNeill Vineyard Management Ltd Mecamarc Provitis NP Seymour Ltd Stacatruc Ltd Vitifruit Equipment Hans Wanner GmbH MICRO NUTRIENTS GreenBest Ltd Solufeed Ltd NETTING Capatex Ltd NUTRIENTS Aston Horticulture Ltd Hortifeeds Yara UK Ltd PESTICIDES Fargro Ltd PLANT HEALTH PROMOTERS Aston Horticulture Ltd FAST LLP All addresses and contact details from page 52 49

50 2014 Buyers Guide POLYTUNNELS Haygrove Ltd Platipus Anchors Ltd XL Horticulture Ltd POST & WIRE SYSTEMS ArcelorMittal Sheffield Ltd Eugen Weis Hadley Group POTS & CONTAINERS Agro CSP PRESSES Amòs Industrie Core Equipment Ltd NP Seymour Ltd Vigo Ltd PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT Campden BRI PRUNING EQUIPMENT Agricare Amòs Industrie Richard Burton Specialised Machinery Lamberhurst Engineering Ltd NP Seymour Ltd PUMPS & PUMPING EQUIPMENT Amòs Industrie Core Equipment Ltd NP Seymour Ltd Vigo Ltd QUALITY ASSURANCE INSTRUMENTS Index Instruments Ltd QCL REFRACTOMETERS Index Instruments Ltd RESEARCH The Food & Environment Research Agency Plumpton College ROOTSTOCKS McNeill Vineyard Management Ltd SOIL ANALYSIS John Buchan Agronomy SOIL PREPARATION FGS Organics SOLUBLE FERTILISERS Aston Horticulture Ltd Solufeed Ltd Yara UK Ltd SPRAYING EQUIPMENT Berthoud Sprayers Ltd Richard Burton Specialised Machinery Lamberhurst Engineering Ltd NP Seymour Ltd Hans Wanner GmbH SPARKLING WINE EQUIPMENT Vigo Ltd STOPPERS Rankin Brothers & Sons Ltd STORAGE Amòs Industrie SUNDRIES Tubex, Fiberweb Geosynthetics Vigo Ltd 50 All addresses and contact details from page 52

51 2014 Buyers Guide TANKS & VATS Amòs Industrie BevTech Ltd Clemens GmbH & Co. KG Core Equipment Ltd Taransaud Tonnellerie Tonnellerie Rousseau Vicard Tonnelleries Vigo Ltd TEMPERATURE & PRESSURE EQUIPMENT Core Equipment Ltd TEMPERATURE CONTROL Core Equipment Ltd Vigo Ltd TILLAGE & MAINTENANCE EQUIPMENT Lamberhurst Engineering Ltd TRACTORS Richard Burton Specialised Machinery Case IH Agriculture Lamberhurst Engineering Ltd NP Seymour Ltd TRAILERS Lamberhurst Engineering Ltd TRAINING & EDUCATION Concordia UK Ltd Plumpton College TRICKLE IRRIGATION Fieldwater Ltd TRIMMING MACHINES Clemens GmbH & Co. KG Lamberhurst Engineering Ltd NP Seymour Ltd VERMIN CONTROL Scare m J. Toms Ltd VINEYARD DESIGN McNeill Vineyard Management Ltd WEATHER & SOIL MONITORING EQUIPMENT NP Seymour Ltd WEED CONTROL Bayer CropScience Ltd Lamberhurst Engineering Ltd NP Seymour Ltd J. Toms Ltd WELFARE PRODUCTS Agricare WORKSHOP CONSUMMABLES Agricare TRAINING SYSTEMS CLIPS Agro CSP TRELLISING ArcelorMittal Sheffield Ltd Hadley Group All addresses and contact details from page 52 51

52 2014 Buyers Guide Company Addresses & Contacts A E CHAPMAN & SON LTD Timbermill Way, Gauden Road Clapham, London SW4 6LY Tel: Web: AGRICARE Cooting Road, Aylesham Industrial Estate Canterbury, Kent CT3 3EP Tel: Web: AGRII The Crossways, Alconbury Hill Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire PE28 4JH Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Customer Services AGRO CSP Ul. Pilsudskiego 6-10/ Kolbuszowa Podkarpackie Poland Tel: or Web: Contact: Andrzej AGROVISTA UK LTD Cambridge House, Nottingham Road Stapleford, Nottingham NG9 8AB Tel: Fax: Web: AJS LABELS 12 Arndale Road, Lineside Industrial Estate Littlehampton, West Sussex BN17 7HD Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: David Wooster or Alan Bunn 52 Visit pages to check Products & Services these companies offer

53 2014 Buyers Guide AMÒS INDUSTRIE BP Beaune Cedex France Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Alexandre Faupin ASTON HORTICULTURE LTD 34 Bretforton Road, Badsey Evesham, Worcestershire WR11 7YG Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Hugh Struth ANGLIA LABELS LTD Bull Lane, Acton Sudbury, Suffolk CO10 0BD Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Ian Woodhead BAYER CROPSCIENCE LTD 230 Cambridge Science Park Milton Road, Cambridge CB4 0WB Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Bayer Assist ARCELORMITTAL SHEFFIELD LTD Vulcan Works, Birley Vale Close Sheffield S12 2DB Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Sarah Brown BERTHOUD SPRAYERS LTD First Floor, 4 Oldmedow Road Hardwick Industrial Estate King s Lynn, Norfolk PE30 4JJ Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Martin Shackcloth Visit pages to check Products & Services these companies offer 53

54 2014 Buyers Guide BEVTECH LTD The Coach House, Balcombe Road Haywards Heath RH16 1PB Tel: Web: Contact: David Cowderoy JOHN BOURNE & CO LTD Rye Road, Newenden Kent TN18 5QG Tel: Fax: Contact: Peter Traill JOHN BUCHAN AGRONOMY 1a Garden City, Tern Hill Market Drayton, Shropshire TF9 3QB Tel: Contact: John Buchan RICHARD BURTON SPECIALISED MACHINERY Folly Farm, Beck Street Hepworth, Diss IP22 2PN Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Mike Burton CAMPDEN BRI Centenary Hall, Coopers Hill Road Nutfield, Surrey RH1 4HY Tel: Web: Contact: Geoff Taylor CAPATEX LTD 127 Northgate, New Basford Nottingham NG7 7FZ Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Peter Strauss CASE IH AGRICULTURE Cranes Farm Road, Basildon Essex SS14 3AD Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Customer Services 54 Visit pages to check Products & Services these companies offer

55 2014 Buyers Guide CHASE ORGANICS LTD Riverdene Business Park, Molesey Road Hersham, Surrey KT12 4RG Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Richard Rixson CONCORDIA UK LTD 19 North Street, Portslade East Sussex BN41 1DH Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Terry Crosswell CLEMENS GMBH & CO. KG Rudolf-Diesel-Straße Wittlich Germany Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Bernhard Clemens COMPO EXPERT UK LTD Greenheyes, Savey Lane Yoxall, Staffordshire DE13 8PD Tel: Web: Contact: Jeremy McHoul Mobile: CORE EQUIPMENT LTD Unit 3, Everdon Park Heartlands Business Park Daventry, Northamptonshire NN11 8YJ Tel: Web: Contact: Jonathan Chaplin H. ERBEN LTD Lady Lane, Hadleigh Ipswich IP7 6AS Tel: Web: Contact: Alison Hughes Visit pages to check Products & Services these companies offer 55

56 2014 Buyers Guide EUGEN WEIS Hartmannstraße Maikammer Germany Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Ernst Weis EVERRIS LTD Epsilon House, West Road Ipswich IP3 9FJ Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Scott Garnett FARGRO LTD Toddington Lane, Littlehampton West Sussex BN17 7PP Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Sonia Marshall FAST LLP Crop Advisory Services Team Brogdale Farm, Brogdale Road Faversham, Kent ME13 8XZ Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Philippe Parageaud FGS ORGANICS Stanford Bridge Farm, Station Road Pluckley, Ashford, Kent TN27 0RU Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Mark White FIELDWATER LTD Church Farm, Ulcombe Maidstone, Kent ME17 1DN Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Graham Field 56 Visit pages to check Products & Services these companies offer

57 2014 Buyers Guide THE FOOD & ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH AGENCY Sand Hutton, York YO41 1LZ Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Plant Clinic FRUITFUL JOBS LTD Windy Hollow, Upton Bishop Ross on Wye, Herefordshire HR9 7TT Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Justin Emery GREENBEST LTD Unit 2, The Marsh Henstridge, Somerset BA8 0TF Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Simon Gillett HADLEY INDUSTRIES PLC PO Box 92, Downing Street Smethwick, West Midlands B66 2PA Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Adam Lyness HATTINGLEY VALLEY WINES LTD Wield Yard, Lower Wield Nr Alresford, Hampshire SO24 9AJ Tel: Web: Contact: Simon Checketts HAYGROVE LTD Redbank, Little Marcle Road Ledbury, Herefordshire HR8 2JL Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Paul Sneyd Visit pages to check Products & Services these companies offer 57

58 2014 Buyers Guide HORTIFEEDS Park Farm, Kettlethorpe Lincoln LN1 2LD Tel: Web: Contact: Andy Judd LAMBERHURST ENGINEERING LTD Priory Farm, Parsonage Lane Lamberhurst, Kent TN3 8DS Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Andrew Fuller HL HUTCHINSON LTD Unit 1 & 2, Parkway Garage Parkway, Ledbury Herefordshire HR8 2JD Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Chris Cooper Mobile: LANDSEER LTD Lodge Farm, Goat Hall Lane Chelmsford, Essex CM2 8PH Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Mark Tully INDEX INSTRUMENTS LTD Bury Road Industrial Estate Old Station Road, Ramsey Cambridgeshire PE26 1NF Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Nigel Futter LANSDOWN INSURANCE BROKERS Lansdown House, Pitville Circus Road Cheltenham, Gloucestershire GL52 2QE Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Fred Invine or Tim Davies 58 Visit pages to check Products & Services these companies offer

59 2014 Buyers Guide LITMUS WINES London Road Dorking, Surrey RH5 6AA Tel: Web: Contact: Mike Florence MCNEILL VINEYARD MANAGEMENT LTD 40 Jubilee Rise, Danbury Essex CM3 4JA Tel: Web: Contact: Duncan McNeill LOWS OF DUNDEE LTD PO Box 300, Marrbank House 6 Paradise Road, Dundee DD1 9JZ Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Rosie Wrigley MECAMARC La Pierre Qui Tourne Oeuilly France Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Bastian Wiegmann LS SYSTEMS LTD 184 Blackgate Lane Tarleton, Preston PR4 6UU Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Peter Brooks NETAFIM UK Penketh Place, West Pimbo Skelmersdale, Linco lnshire WN8 9QX Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Graeme Francis Visit pages to check Products & Services these companies offer 59

60 2014 Buyers Guide PLATIPUS ANCHORS LTD Kingsfield Business Centre, Philanthropic Road Redhill, Surrey RH1 4DP Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Jeff Curnick PLUMPTON COLLEGE Ditchling Road, Lewes East Sussex BN7 3AE Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Chris Foss PROVITIS Z.I. Rue des frères Peugeot Sainte Croix en Plaine France Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Didier Andelfinger \ QCL Riverside, Forest Row Business Park Forest Row, East Sussex RH18 5DW Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Matthew Burwood QUINTON EDWARDS Bartholomew House, 38 London Road Newbury, Berkshire RG14 1JX Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Simon Quinton Smith RANKIN BROTHERS & SONS LTD 3C Drakes Farm, Drakes Drive Long Crendon, Buckinghamshire HP18 9BA Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Jim Rankin SCARE M Tawney Barn, Tawney Common Epping, Essex CM16 7PX Tel: Web: Contact: John Galloway Mobile: Visit pages to check Products & Services these companies offer

61 2014 Buyers Guide NP SEYMOUR LTD Avon Works, Cranbrook Kent TN17 2PT Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Nick Seymour SOLUFEED LTD Highground Orchards, Highground Lane Barnham, Nr Bognor Regis West Sussex PO22 0BT Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Dick Holden TARANSAUD TONNELLERIE Avenue de Gimeux Merpins - CS Cognac Cedex France Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Frederic Tailleur J. TOMS LTD 7 Marley Farm, Headcorn Road Smarden, Ashford Kent TN27 8PJ Tel: Web: Contact: Rob Harrison TONNELLERIE ROUSSEAU Z.A. des Champys Couchey France Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Frederic Rousseau STACATRUC LTD Unit 10, Pipers Lane Trading Estate Pipers Lane, Thatcham Berkshire RG19 4NA Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: David Hart TUBEX, FIBERWEB GEOSYNTHETICS Fiberweb Maldon Blackwater Trading Estate The Causeway, Maldon Essex CM9 4GG Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Tim Oliver Visit pages to check Products & Services these companies offer 61

62 2014 Buyers Guide VICARD TONNELLERIES 184, rue Haute de Crouin Cognac France Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Pierre Marchais VIGO LTD Dunkeswell, Devon EX14 4LF Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Jon Clatworthy VITIFRUIT EQUIPMENT Unit 3 Skitts Manor Farm, Moor Lane Marsh Green, Kent TN8 5RA Tel: Web: Contact: Richard Witt HANS WANNER GMBH Simoniusstraße Wangen in Allgäu Germany Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Horsepower UK Ltd, Phil Stanford ( ) XL HORTICULTURE LTD Exmouth Road, West Hill Ottery St Mary, Devon EX11 1JZ Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Les Lane YARA UK LTD Harvest House, Europarc Grimsby, NE Lincolnshire DN37 9TZ Tel: Fax: Web: Contact: Mike Stoker 62 Visit pages to check Products & Services these companies offer

63 Industry contacts at a glance ADAS Horticultural Headquarters Commercial Horticultural Association Crop Protection Association DEFRA East Malling Research English Wine Producers The Food & Environment Research Agency (FERA) The Food Standards Agency Wine Standards Board Horticultural Development Company (HDC) National Farmers Union Organic Advisory Service Chemicals Regulation Directorate Plumpton College Royal Agricultural University Soil Association The Wine & Spirit Trade Association

64

Wine On-Premise UK 2018

Wine On-Premise UK 2018 Wine On-Premise UK 2018 T H E M E N U Introduction... Page 5 The UK s Best On-Premise Distributors... Page 7 The UK s Most Listed Wine Brands... Page 17 The Big Picture... Page 26 The Style Mix... Page

More information

Sustainable Coffee Challenge FAQ

Sustainable Coffee Challenge FAQ Sustainable Coffee Challenge FAQ What is the Sustainable Coffee Challenge? The Sustainable Coffee Challenge is a pre-competitive collaboration of partners working across the coffee sector, united in developing

More information

CASE STUDY: HOW STARBUCKS BREWS LOGISTICS SUCCESS

CASE STUDY: HOW STARBUCKS BREWS LOGISTICS SUCCESS CASE STUDY: HOW STARBUCKS BREWS LOGISTICS SUCCESS We love to put order in your chaos. Morai Logistics Inc. is a 3rd party logistics provider with an operating agency agreement representing Mode Transportation.

More information

HONDURAS. A Quick Scan on Improving the Economic Viability of Coffee Farming A QUICK SCAN ON IMPROVING THE ECONOMIC VIABILITY OF COFFEE FARMING

HONDURAS. A Quick Scan on Improving the Economic Viability of Coffee Farming A QUICK SCAN ON IMPROVING THE ECONOMIC VIABILITY OF COFFEE FARMING HONDURAS A Quick Scan on Improving the Economic Viability of Coffee Farming 1 OBJECTIVES OF STUDY Overall objective Identify opportunities for potential benefits to coffee farmers from improved farm profitability

More information

Psa and Italian Kiwifruit Orchards an observation by Callum Kay, 4 April 2011

Psa and Italian Kiwifruit Orchards an observation by Callum Kay, 4 April 2011 Psa and Italian Kiwifruit Orchards, 2011 The Psa-research programme in New Zealand draws on knowledge and experience gained from around the world particularly in Italy, where ZESPRI, Plant & Food Research

More information

Starbucks BRAZIL. Presentation Outline

Starbucks BRAZIL. Presentation Outline Starbucks BRAZIL Prepared by: Aminata Ouattara Daniele Albagli Melissa Butz Matvey Kostromichev Presentation Outline Introduction Mission & Objectives PESTEL Analysis PORTER Analysis SWOT Analysis Capabilities

More information

Grape Growers of Ontario Developing key measures to critically look at the grape and wine industry

Grape Growers of Ontario Developing key measures to critically look at the grape and wine industry Grape Growers of Ontario Developing key measures to critically look at the grape and wine industry March 2012 Background and scope of the project Background The Grape Growers of Ontario GGO is looking

More information

Commitment of all. parties enables. high-quality table. grape production. The Moroccan Table Grape Project

Commitment of all. parties enables. high-quality table. grape production. The Moroccan Table Grape Project The Moroccan Table Grape Project Commitment of all parties enables high-quality table grape production How it all started Grapes are grown on over 50,000 hectares of land in Morocco, with table grapes

More information

HERZLIA MIDDLE SCHOOL

HERZLIA MIDDLE SCHOOL NAME TEACHER S COMMENT TEACHER CLASS PARENT S COMMENT MARK PERCENTAGE PARENT S SIGNATURE HERZLIA MIDDLE SCHOOL GRADE 7 ECONOMIC & MANAGEMENT SCIENCES 27 AUGUST 2015 TIME: 50 minutes MARKS: 70 o This paper

More information

Cut the cost of coffee in an instant

Cut the cost of coffee in an instant Case Study Cut the cost of coffee in an instant If you produce instant coffee you could cut packaging costs by more than 20% by moving to Best in Class packaging weights. That s the conclusion of WRAP

More information

STOP CROP GROW. Feijoa. information sheet

STOP CROP GROW. Feijoa. information sheet STOP CROP GROW Feijoa information sheet Tararua District Council PO Box 115 Dannevirke 4942 06 374 4080 info@tararuadc.govt.nz Head office 26 Gordon Street Dannevirke FEIJOA INFORMATION SHEET 3 Contents

More information

Roaster/Production Operative. Coffee for The People by The Coffee People. Our Values: The Role:

Roaster/Production Operative. Coffee for The People by The Coffee People. Our Values: The Role: Are you an enthusiastic professional with a passion for ensuring the highest quality and service for your teams? At Java Republic we are currently expanding, so we are looking for an Roaster/Production

More information

Global Perspectives Grant Program

Global Perspectives Grant Program UW College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Global Perspectives Grant Program Project Report Instructions 1. COVER PAGE Award Period (e.g. Spring 2012): Summer 2015 Principle Investigator(s)_Sadanand

More information

Coffee weather report November 10, 2017.

Coffee weather report November 10, 2017. Coffee weather report November 10, 2017. awhere, Inc., an agricultural intelligence company, is pleased to provide this map-and-chart heavy report focused on the current coffee crop in Brazil. Global stocks

More information

Company name (YUM) Analyst: Roman Sandoval, Niklas Podhraski, Akash Patel Spring Recommendation: Don t Buy Target Price until (12/27/2016): $95

Company name (YUM) Analyst: Roman Sandoval, Niklas Podhraski, Akash Patel Spring Recommendation: Don t Buy Target Price until (12/27/2016): $95 Recommendation: Don t Buy Target Price until (12/27/2016): $95 1. Reasons for the Recommendation One of the most important reasons why we don t want to buy Yum is the growth prospects of the company in

More information

Streamlining Food Safety: Preventive Controls Brings Industry Closer to SQF Certification. One world. One standard.

Streamlining Food Safety: Preventive Controls Brings Industry Closer to SQF Certification. One world. One standard. Streamlining Food Safety: Preventive Controls Brings Industry Closer to SQF Certification One world. One standard. Streamlining Food Safety: Preventive Controls Brings Industry Closer to SQF Certification

More information

UKRAINE Climate conditions and soil in Ukraine are suitable for growing nut trees.

UKRAINE Climate conditions and soil in Ukraine are suitable for growing nut trees. UKRAINE Ukraine has the largest area of agricultural land in Europe with approximately 43 m ha of land out of which 32.5 m ha are used for crop production. In Ukraine, there are 400 thousand hectares of

More information

Wine Australia for Australian Wine. Strategic Plan At a glance

Wine Australia for Australian Wine. Strategic Plan At a glance Wine Australia for Australian Wine Strategic Plan 2015 2020 At a glance Introduction This Australian Grape and Wine Authority Strategic Plan 2015 2020: At a glance provides a high-level overview of our

More information

World of Wine: From Grape to Glass

World of Wine: From Grape to Glass World of Wine: From Grape to Glass Course Details No Prerequisites Required Course Dates Start Date: th 18 August 2016 0:00 AM UTC End Date: st 31 December 2018 0:00 AM UTC Time Commitment Between 2 to

More information

16 17 October 2018 caffecultureshow.com

16 17 October 2018 caffecultureshow.com caffecultureshow.com 2 New Team, New Venue, New Dates, New Rates After 11 years at Olympia, the event is moving to the Business Design Centre in Islington, which is in the heart of one of London s most

More information

NZ GEOGRAPHICAL INDICATION (GI)

NZ GEOGRAPHICAL INDICATION (GI) NZ GEOGRAPHICAL INDICATION (GI) EXAMINATION CHECKSHEET Application information (reg 7) and formalities Box Reference Number 1 GI Number: 1015 GI Name: WAIHEKE ISLAND 2 New Zealand GI correctly selected

More information

Fairtrade a sustainable choice

Fairtrade a sustainable choice Fairtrade a sustainable choice Sustainability means we can meet people s needs today without compromising the needs of people in the future. For Fairtrade, this means building strong economies, healthy

More information

Welcome to the Play it Safe campaign pack

Welcome to the Play it Safe campaign pack Welcome to the Play it Safe campaign pack FSA Play it Safe Campaign Pack Why we need your help The Food Standards Agency (FSA) is working to protect consumers from any food safety problems during the 2012

More information

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQS)

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQS) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQS) Table of Contents CAS FAQ... 4 1.1... CAS FAQ 4 2 1.1.1 What is Coffee Assurance Services (CAS)? 4 1.1.2 What is the vision of Coffee Assurance Services? 4 1.1.3 What

More information

CENTRAL OTAGO WINEGROWERS ASSOCIATION (INC.)

CENTRAL OTAGO WINEGROWERS ASSOCIATION (INC.) CENTRAL OTAGO WINEGROWERS ASSOCIATION (INC.) Executive Officer: Natalie Wilson President: James Dicey Central Otago Winegrowers Assn E: james@grapevision.co.nz P.O. Box 155 Ph. 027 445 0602 Cromwell, Central

More information

Gluten regulations frequently asked questions

Gluten regulations frequently asked questions Gluten regulations frequently asked questions Commission Regulation 41/2009 concerning the composition and labelling of foodstuffs suitable for people intolerant to gluten (coeliacs) Know the rules Factual

More information

Certified Coffees, current market and a vision into the future.

Certified Coffees, current market and a vision into the future. Certified Coffees, current market and a vision into the future. To talk about certification programs in coffee today, we must first look into the past history of the coffee trade and identify when and

More information

Final Report. TITLE: Developing Methods for Use of Own-rooted Vitis vinifera Vines in Michigan Vineyards

Final Report. TITLE: Developing Methods for Use of Own-rooted Vitis vinifera Vines in Michigan Vineyards Final Report TITLE: Developing Methods for Use of Own-rooted Vitis vinifera Vines in Michigan Vineyards PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Thomas J. Zabadal OBJECTIVES: (1) To determine the ability to culture varieties

More information

Introduction. Market for drinks cans - UK and Eire

Introduction. Market for drinks cans - UK and Eire Introduction This Report brings together statistics and commentary on the UK market for drinks cans and provides a reference point for readers interested in the take home market for beer, cider and carbonated

More information

a rare and precious vintage in Bourgogne

a rare and precious vintage in Bourgogne Press release a rare and precious vintage in Bourgogne 12 November 2012 A first! That is what Bourgogne s winegrowers are saying about this year s weather. Given Mother Nature s whims, they had to redouble

More information

A world of premium powders for every application

A world of premium powders for every application A world of premium powders for every application Gerkens Cacao: blending endless opportunities with consistent performance Every day, millions of consumers around the world are enticed by deliciously chocolaty

More information

The Weights and Measures (Specified Quantities) (Unwrapped Bread and Intoxicating Liquor) Order 2011

The Weights and Measures (Specified Quantities) (Unwrapped Bread and Intoxicating Liquor) Order 2011 The Weights and Measures (Specified Quantities) (Unwrapped Bread and Intoxicating Liquor) Order 2011 Guidance for Businesses July 2011 Version 1 Page 1 of 7 Guidance first issued/ Date of change July 2011

More information

FRANCHISING. PRESENTED BY: Beant Singh Roll No MBA I (F)

FRANCHISING. PRESENTED BY: Beant Singh Roll No MBA I (F) FRANCHISING PRESENTED BY: Beant Singh Roll No. 120425720 MBA I (F) INTRODUCTION Franchising refers to the methods of practicing and using another person's philosophy of business. The franchisor grants

More information

Adamo Winery Propane Cannon Use. Town of Mono, OMAFRA, Adamo Winery, Mono Citizens

Adamo Winery Propane Cannon Use. Town of Mono, OMAFRA, Adamo Winery, Mono Citizens Adamo Winery Propane Cannon Use Town of Mono, OMAFRA, Adamo Winery, Mono Citizens 2017-01-13 Agenda OMAFRA Normal Farm Practice Overview Mono By-Laws, Revenues, Taxes, Tourism, Community Adamo Problem

More information

Status Report on CFC funded Project in India

Status Report on CFC funded Project in India Status Report on CFC funded Project in India DEVELOPMENT, PRODUCTION AND TRADE OF ORGANIC TEA (PHASE II) Presentation made during the19th Session of FAO-IGG Tea 12-14 May 2010, NEW DELHI by Roshni Sen,

More information

ILSI Workshop on Food Allergy: From Thresholds to Action Levels. The Regulators perspective

ILSI Workshop on Food Allergy: From Thresholds to Action Levels. The Regulators perspective ILSI Workshop on Food Allergy: From Thresholds to Action Levels The Regulators perspective 13-14 September 2012 Reading, UK Sue Hattersley UK Food Standards Agency Public health approach Overview Guidance

More information

Find the wine you are looking for at the best prices.

Find the wine you are looking for at the best prices. Media Kit 2017 Wine-Searcher Find the wine you are looking for at the best prices. Wine-Searcher is dedicated to finding and pricing wine. Thanks to some seriously smart tech, Wine-Searcher brings the

More information

LIVE Wines Backgrounder Certified Sustainable Northwest Wines

LIVE Wines Backgrounder Certified Sustainable Northwest Wines LIVE Wines Backgrounder Certified Sustainable Northwest Wines Principled Wine Production LIVE Wines are independently certified to meet strict international standards for environmentally and socially responsible

More information

dedicated to yeast For over half a century now, ALGIST BRUGGEMAN has been manufacturing yeast, the vital ingredient in our daily bread.

dedicated to yeast For over half a century now, ALGIST BRUGGEMAN has been manufacturing yeast, the vital ingredient in our daily bread. dedicated to yeast dedicated to yeast For over half a century now, ALGIST BRUGGEMAN has been manufacturing yeast, the vital ingredient in our daily bread. We supply our top-quality yeast to the bread

More information

Bergman. Euro-National VINEYARD VALUES STARTING 2017 FOR NAPA AND SONOMA COUNTIES

Bergman. Euro-National VINEYARD VALUES STARTING 2017 FOR NAPA AND SONOMA COUNTIES Bergman Euro-National S U M M E R 2 0 1 7 N E W S L E T T E R VINEYARD VALUES STARTING 2017 FOR NAPA AND SONOMA COUNTIES 2017 A VERY SPECIAL YEAR 2017 is an important year, as it marks 50 years of selling

More information

Chef de Partie Apprenticeship Standard

Chef de Partie Apprenticeship Standard Chef de Partie Apprenticeship Standard NCFE Level 3 Certificate In Hospitality and Catering Principles (Professional Cookery) (601/7915/6) NCFE Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Professional Cookery (601/8005/5)

More information

More success with Coffee. thanks to BRITA-treated water

More success with Coffee. thanks to BRITA-treated water More success with Coffee thanks to BRITA-treated water Clarity, simplicity, enjoyment Coffee A Success Story with a Future Espresso, ristretto, cappuccino, latte macchiato the brown bean business is booming:

More information

Your own French truffles from Provence.

Your own French truffles from Provence. Your own French truffles from Provence. Known worldwide for its exceptional climate and rich soil, the Provence region is at the heart of the French black trufflegrowing tradition. This unique territory

More information

Salem Cider Convention

Salem Cider Convention Tim Larsen 277 S Ward Ave East Wenatchee, WA 98802 Phone: 509.885.2734 E-Mail: larsenrud@gmail.com Web: SnowdriftCider.com Salem Cider Convention Report on Federal Regulations Concerning Cider February

More information

IDH Programs in Vietnam

IDH Programs in Vietnam IDH, The Sustainable Trade Initiative accelerates and up scales sustainable trade by building impact oriented coalitions of front running companies, civil society organizations, governments and other stakeholders.

More information

GUIDANCE NOTE ON UK IMPLEMENTATION OF A EUROPEAN DIRECTIVE DEREGULATING SPECIFIED QUANTITIES (FIXED PACK SIZES)

GUIDANCE NOTE ON UK IMPLEMENTATION OF A EUROPEAN DIRECTIVE DEREGULATING SPECIFIED QUANTITIES (FIXED PACK SIZES) Page 1 of 9 Version 1 January 2009 GUIDANCE NOTE ON UK IMPLEMENTATION OF A EUROPEAN DIRECTIVE DEREGULATING SPECIFIED QUANTITIES (FIXED PACK SIZES) Introduction 1. This guidance has been produced by the

More information

Food Intolerance & Expertise SARAH KEOGH CONSULTANT DIETITIAN EATWELL FOOD & NUTRITION

Food Intolerance & Expertise SARAH KEOGH CONSULTANT DIETITIAN EATWELL FOOD & NUTRITION Food Intolerance & Expertise SARAH KEOGH CONSULTANT DIETITIAN EATWELL FOOD & NUTRITION Food Intolerance & Expertise What is food intolerance? Common food intolerances Why are consumers claiming more food

More information

Sustainable grape production for the reestablishment of Iowa s grape industry

Sustainable grape production for the reestablishment of Iowa s grape industry Competitive Grant Report 02-46 Sustainable grape production for the reestablishment of Iowa s grape industry Abstract: Reviving the grape industry in Iowa requires development of improved sustainable production

More information

NEEDS ASSESSMENT. Overview of Inputs Required for Apple Juice Production in Montezuma County

NEEDS ASSESSMENT. Overview of Inputs Required for Apple Juice Production in Montezuma County 1 NEEDS ASSESSMENT Overview of Inputs Required for Apple Juice Production in Montezuma County 2 Components of Overall Project Updated Market Study for Montezuma County Apples (Complete and Available) Needs

More information

Territorial branding. Dr. Steve Charters MW. Essence distilled, Excellence instilled

Territorial branding. Dr. Steve Charters MW. Essence distilled, Excellence instilled Territorial branding Dr. Steve Charters MW Essence distilled, Excellence instilled Presentation outline What is a territorial brand? The example of Central Otago Some conclusions. SCHOOL OF WINE & SPIRITS

More information

and the World Market for Wine The Central Valley is a Central Part of the Competitive World of Wine What is happening in the world of wine?

and the World Market for Wine The Central Valley is a Central Part of the Competitive World of Wine What is happening in the world of wine? The Central Valley Winegrape Industry and the World Market for Wine Daniel A. Sumner University it of California i Agricultural l Issues Center January 5, 211 The Central Valley is a Central Part of the

More information

2018 Convention WASHINGTON WINE: BY DESIGN LEARN SOMETHING NEW AND LEARN WHAT S NEW!

2018 Convention WASHINGTON WINE: BY DESIGN LEARN SOMETHING NEW AND LEARN WHAT S NEW! 2018 Convention WASHINGTON WINE: BY DESIGN LEARN SOMETHING NEW AND LEARN WHAT S NEW! An opportunity for both small and large industry members to learn, connect, and excel! SEE, TASTE, AND EXPERIENCE THE

More information

Exportadora de Café California. Exportadora de Café California. Finance resilience in Coffee.

Exportadora de Café California. Exportadora de Café California. Finance resilience in Coffee. Exportadora de Café California Finance resilience in Coffee. Mexico City. March 2018 Context Café California and Mexico Overview of the country value chain Exportadora de Café California ECC 20% Farmers

More information

NZ GEOGRAPHICAL INDICATION (GI)

NZ GEOGRAPHICAL INDICATION (GI) NZ GEOGRAPHICAL INDICATION (GI) EXAMINATION CHECKSHEET Application information (reg 7) and formalities Box Reference Number 1 GI Number: 1021 GI Name: MATAKANA 2 New Zealand GI correctly selected (cf foreign)

More information

AWRI Refrigeration Demand Calculator

AWRI Refrigeration Demand Calculator AWRI Refrigeration Demand Calculator Resources and expertise are readily available to wine producers to manage efficient refrigeration supply and plant capacity. However, efficient management of winery

More information

MONTHLY COFFEE MARKET REPORT

MONTHLY COFFEE MARKET REPORT E MONTHLY COFFEE MARKET REPORT February 2014 February 2014 has seen significant developments in the coffee market, with prices shooting upwards at a startling rate. The ICO composite daily price has increased

More information

POSITION DESCRIPTION. DATE OF VERSION: August Position Summary:

POSITION DESCRIPTION. DATE OF VERSION: August Position Summary: POSITION DESCRIPTION POSITION TITLE: DEPARTMENT: REPORTING TO: Wine Ambassador Global Marketing Graduate Manager LOCATION: Various PR JOB BAND: Local Banding F DATE OF VERSION: August 2016 Position Summary:

More information

Valley Green Tea Wholesale Information for Retailers

Valley Green Tea Wholesale Information for Retailers Valley Green Tea Wholesale Information for Retailers Contact : En Jie Song Phone :(02)9570 3571; 0413-662-798 Email: sales@valleygreentea.com.au www.valleygreentea.com.au Contents Contents... 2 About Valley

More information

Global Grape Report JUI CE P RODU C TS A S SOCI ATION FA L L BU S I N ESS M E E TING N OV E MBER 5,

Global Grape Report JUI CE P RODU C TS A S SOCI ATION FA L L BU S I N ESS M E E TING N OV E MBER 5, Global Grape Report JUICE PRODUCTS ASSOCIATION 2017 FALL BUSINESS MEETING NOVEMBER 5, 2017 DEDICATED BROKERS IN 8 COUNTRIES GLOBALLY BASED TO BUILD YOUR BUSINESS WORLDWIDE INTRODUCTION Ciatti Co 8 Regional

More information

Customer Focused, Science Driven, Results Led

Customer Focused, Science Driven, Results Led Navigating allergen claims, labelling requirements and what they actually mean for manufacturers Simon Flanagan Senior Consultant Food Safety and Allergens Customer Focused, Science Driven, Results Led

More information

Crus et Domaines de France. Book 2017

Crus et Domaines de France. Book 2017 Crus et Domaines de France HANNETOT EXCUSIVITE Book 2017 Pessac-Léognan HISTORY OF THE CHÂTEAU Since the beginning of the 18th Century, this domain has been producing wine. Formerly named Hantot, the chateau

More information

Growing divergence between Arabica and Robusta exports

Growing divergence between Arabica and Robusta exports Growing divergence between Arabica and Robusta exports In April 218, the ICO composite indicator decreased by.4% to an average of 112.56, with the daily price ranging between 11.49 and 114.73. Prices for

More information

ECONOMIC IMPACT OF WINE AND VINEYARDS IN NAPA COUNTY

ECONOMIC IMPACT OF WINE AND VINEYARDS IN NAPA COUNTY ECONOMIC IMPACT OF WINE AND VINEYARDS IN NAPA COUNTY An Report prepared for Jack L. Davies Napa Valley Agricultural Land Preservation Fund and Napa Valley Vintners JUNE 2005 FULL ECONOMIC IMPACT OF WINE

More information

Fonterra: GLOBAL DAIRY UPDATE JULY 2013 ISSUE ELEVEN

Fonterra: GLOBAL DAIRY UPDATE JULY 2013 ISSUE ELEVEN Fonterra: GLOBAL DAIRY UPDATE JULY 2013 ISSUE ELEVEN Welcome to our latest Global Dairy Update. The Update is Fonterra s commitment to continually educating and informing our farmers and wider stakeholders

More information

CHAPTER 7.3 FOCUS ON FAIRTRADE PRODUCTS COCOA

CHAPTER 7.3 FOCUS ON FAIRTRADE PRODUCTS COCOA CHAPTER 7.3 FOCUS ON FAIRTRADE PRODUCTS COCOA MONITORING THE SCOPE AND BENEFITS OF FAIRTRADE SIXTH EDITION 2014 95 MONITORING THE SCOPE AND BENEFITS OF FAIRTRADE SIXTH EDITION 2014 96 7.3 Fairtrade Fact

More information

Testing phase of the first solar restaurant of France (Europe) Pierre-André Aubert. Association Rêves Germés Restaurant Le Présage

Testing phase of the first solar restaurant of France (Europe) Pierre-André Aubert. Association Rêves Germés Restaurant Le Présage Testing phase of the first solar restaurant of France (Europe) Pierre-André Aubert Association Rêves Germés Restaurant Le Présage http://restaurantlepresage.fr contact@restaurantlepresage.fr +33 (0)6 17

More information

RESOLUTION OIV-ECO

RESOLUTION OIV-ECO RESOLUTION OIV-ECO 563-2016 TRAINING PROGRAMS FOR OENOLOGISTS THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY, based on the work of the FORMAT Expert Group, CONSIDERING the resolution OIV-ECO 492-2013 providing the definition of

More information

ACOS ETHIOPIA CASE STUDY

ACOS ETHIOPIA CASE STUDY OUR HISTORY It was only 2005 when Acos Ethiopia came to light from a pioneering idea of forward thinking people, the Pedon family. Ethiopia then was an even more challenging environment than it is now,

More information

PRESS REPORT OF FAIRS 2012

PRESS REPORT OF FAIRS 2012 PRESS REPORT OF FAIRS 2012 PRESS REPORT: 15.02.2012 FAIRS OF TASTES end successfully The exhibition venue hosted domestic and foreign companies that presented their renowned brands and guidelines for their

More information

Small Winemaker Production and Sales Survey Report November 2017

Small Winemaker Production and Sales Survey Report November 2017 Small Winemaker Production and Sales Survey Report 2016-17 November 2017 Wine Australia 2 Summary of findings It is estimated that small winemakers (those crushing up to 500 tonnes) contribute 8 per cent

More information

ETHIOPIA. A Quick Scan on Improving the Economic Viability of Coffee Farming A QUICK SCAN ON IMPROVING THE ECONOMIC VIABILITY OF COFFEE FARMING

ETHIOPIA. A Quick Scan on Improving the Economic Viability of Coffee Farming A QUICK SCAN ON IMPROVING THE ECONOMIC VIABILITY OF COFFEE FARMING ETHIOPIA A Quick Scan on Improving the Economic Viability of Coffee Farming 1 OBJECTIVES OF STUDY Overall objective Identify opportunities for potential benefits to coffee farmers from improved farm profitability

More information

Fungicides for phoma control in winter oilseed rape

Fungicides for phoma control in winter oilseed rape October 2016 Fungicides for phoma control in winter oilseed rape Summary of AHDB Cereals & Oilseeds fungicide project 2010-2014 (RD-2007-3457) and 2015-2016 (214-0006) While the Agriculture and Horticulture

More information

VINEYARDS 2017 PRESS KIT

VINEYARDS 2017 PRESS KIT VINEYARDS 2017 PRESS KIT Introduction Mirabel, of wondrous beauty, perfectly represents the Reimer family s stunning South East Kelowna hilltop estate and vineyard overlooking the beautiful Okanagan Valley.

More information

MILLENNIAL CONSUMERS SEEK NEW TASTES, WILLING TO PAY A PREMIUM FOR ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES. Nielsen Releases Most Comprehensive Study To Date

MILLENNIAL CONSUMERS SEEK NEW TASTES, WILLING TO PAY A PREMIUM FOR ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES. Nielsen Releases Most Comprehensive Study To Date The Nielsen Company 150 North Martingale Road Schaumburg, IL 60173-2076 www.nielsen.com News Release CONTACT: Jennifer Frighetto, 847-605-5686 jennifer.frighetto@nielsen.com FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE MILLENNIAL

More information

Réseau Vinicole Européen R&D d'excellence

Réseau Vinicole Européen R&D d'excellence Réseau Vinicole Européen R&D d'excellence Lien de la Vigne / Vinelink 1 Paris, 09th March 2012 R&D is strategic for the sustainable competitiveness of the EU wine sector However R&D focus and investment

More information

Delicious goodies from a combi oven & conventional oven. prepared with perfect BRITA water

Delicious goodies from a combi oven & conventional oven. prepared with perfect BRITA water Delicious goodies from a combi oven & conventional oven prepared with perfect BRITA water Freshness, aroma, taste Culinary pleasures good presentation is all! Customers now demand more than just a full

More information

Gavin Quinney s Bordeaux Report

Gavin Quinney s Bordeaux Report Gavin Quinney s Bordeaux Report THE WEATHER 214 To understand the weather is to understand the vintage - and the wines. My first vintage was in 1964 and I can honestly say that, since then, no two vintages

More information

Coffee Eco-labeling: Profit, Prosperity, & Healthy Nature? Brian Crespi Andre Goncalves Janani Kannan Alexey Kudryavtsev Jessica Stern

Coffee Eco-labeling: Profit, Prosperity, & Healthy Nature? Brian Crespi Andre Goncalves Janani Kannan Alexey Kudryavtsev Jessica Stern Coffee Eco-labeling: Profit, Prosperity, & Healthy Nature? Brian Crespi Andre Goncalves Janani Kannan Alexey Kudryavtsev Jessica Stern Presentation Outline I. Introduction II. III. IV. Question at hand

More information

Acreage Forecast

Acreage Forecast World (John Sandbakken and Larry Kleingartner) The sunflower is native to North America but commercialization of the plant took place in Russia. Sunflower oil is the preferred oil in most of Europe, Mexico

More information

Welcome to Coffee Planet

Welcome to Coffee Planet franchising Welcome to Coffee Planet We are on a journey to bring our coffee to the world and we are looking for partners to help deliver our mission and share in our combined success. We hope this book

More information

GI Protection in Europe

GI Protection in Europe GI Protection in Europe Product approach Currently 4 kinds of goods can be protected under the EU quality schemes: Wines (Regulation 1308/2013) Aromatized wines (Regulation 251/2014) Spirit drinks (Regulation

More information

Prepare and serve wines

Prepare and serve wines Prepare and serve wines K/601/4939 Learner name: Learner number: VTCT is the specialist awarding body for the Hairdressing, Beauty Therapy, Complementary Therapy, Hospitality and Catering and Sport and

More information

Press release. Döhler to present innovative and tailored products and product applications at ANUGA 2013

Press release. Döhler to present innovative and tailored products and product applications at ANUGA 2013 Döhler to present innovative and tailored products and product applications at ANUGA 2013 As a global producer, marketer and provider of technology-based natural ingredients, ingredient systems and integrated

More information

MICROBREWERS EVENT Dr. Sarah de Vos

MICROBREWERS EVENT Dr. Sarah de Vos MICROBREWERS EVENT Dr. Sarah de Vos is the founder of Stumptail craft brewery, established in 2011. For more information on Stumptail please visit their webpage at www.stumptail.co.uk Stumptail is a registered

More information

SMALLHOLDER TEA FARMING AND VALUE CHAIN DEVELOPMENT IN CHINA

SMALLHOLDER TEA FARMING AND VALUE CHAIN DEVELOPMENT IN CHINA SMALLHOLDER TEA FARMING AND VALUE CHAIN DEVELOPMENT IN CHINA Intersessional Meeting of the Intergovernmental Group on Tea Rome, 5-6 May 2014 Cheng Fang, Economist, Trade and Markets Division, FAO Yanjiong

More information

The Contribution made by Beer to the European Economy. Poland - January 2016

The Contribution made by Beer to the European Economy. Poland - January 2016 The Contribution made by Beer to the European Economy Poland - January 2016 Europe Economics is registered in England No. 3477100. Registered offices at Chancery House, 53-64 Chancery Lane, London WC2A

More information

McDonald s Marketing Mix

McDonald s Marketing Mix McDonald s Marketing Mix Max Grover MGMT 473: Principles of Marketing Management Professor Dunlop 4 December, 2009 Page 1 More than 50 years have passed since the first McDonald s was opened in the United

More information

LAKE ONTARIO BEAMSVILLE BENCH VINEMOUNT RIDGE STATISTICS

LAKE ONTARIO BEAMSVILLE BENCH VINEMOUNT RIDGE STATISTICS APPELLATION MAP Appellation Overview Diverse terroir, vine friendly micro climates, remarkably complex wines The Niagara Peninsula has the largest planted area of all viticulture areas in Canada. Situated

More information

Place UK Ltd. Background / Overview

Place UK Ltd. Background / Overview Place UK Ltd This case study outlines the opportunities offered by storing or processing surplus produce. It focuses on a soft fruit grower which has made a significant investment in on-site freezing and

More information

Index. planning your pizzeria 16. company 4. milestones 6. Training 18. Pizza Hub 8. service 19. Products 10. Ali Group 20

Index. planning your pizzeria 16. company 4. milestones 6. Training 18. Pizza Hub 8. service 19. Products 10. Ali Group 20 1 company profile 2 Index company 4 planning your pizzeria 16 milestones 6 Training 18 Pizza Hub 8 service 19 Products 10 Ali Group 20 2 company profile BESIDES BEING PIZZA OVEN MANUFACTURERS, WE CAN ALSO

More information

Productivity. Farm management. Third

Productivity. Farm management. Third History of the Nespresso AAA Sustainable Quality Program The Nespresso AAA is the unique Nespresso sourcing approach, developed to secure the highest quality green coffee required to produce the Nespresso

More information

Table grape. Horticulture trade intelligence. Quarter 1: January to March 2017

Table grape. Horticulture trade intelligence. Quarter 1: January to March 2017 Horticulture trade intelligence A custom report compiled for Hort Innovation by Euromonitor International Table grape Quarter 1: January to March 217 Horticulture trade intelligence: Table grape: 217:

More information

100% Pure Ceylon, Garden Fresh, Single Origin Tea Tea

100% Pure Ceylon, Garden Fresh, Single Origin Tea Tea 100% Pure Ceylon, Garden Fresh, Single Origin Tea Tea Single Origin Pure Ceylon Tea From the Mountains of Sri Lanka to the cups of the World Continuing the legacy of Ceylon Tea that has captivated and

More information

ChAteau de Sours. Martin Krajewski Saint Quentin de Baron. Tél. +33 (0) Fax. +33 (0)

ChAteau de Sours. Martin Krajewski Saint Quentin de Baron. Tél. +33 (0) Fax. +33 (0) ChAteau de Sours Grand Vin de Bordeaux Martin Krajewski 33 750 Saint Quentin de Baron Tél. +33 (0)5 57 24 10 81 Fax. +33 (0)5 57 24 10 83 www.chateaudesours.com La Source Rose 2008 2008 was another very

More information

Advancing Agriculture Grape Industry Development Program

Advancing Agriculture Grape Industry Development Program 2017-2018 Advancing Agriculture Grape Industry Development Program 1) Objectives: To provide assistance for the establishment of new or more productive vineyards. To assist with the adoption of new technologies

More information

ALSACE WINE PRODUCTION BY NUMBERS

ALSACE WINE PRODUCTION BY NUMBERS ALSACE WINE PRODUCTION BY NUMBERS A report compiled by the Back In Alsace Project 1 from data released in May 2017 by the Conseil Interprofessional des Vins d Alsace (CIVA 2 ). Thanks to the CIVA for making

More information

GREAT WINE CAPITALS GLOBAL NETWORK MARKET SURVEY FINANCIAL STABILITY AND VIABILITY OF WINE TOURISM BUSINESS IN THE GWC

GREAT WINE CAPITALS GLOBAL NETWORK MARKET SURVEY FINANCIAL STABILITY AND VIABILITY OF WINE TOURISM BUSINESS IN THE GWC GREAT WINE CAPITALS GLOBAL NETWORK MARKET SURVEY 2010-2011 FINANCIAL STABILITY AND VIABILITY OF WINE TOURISM BUSINESS IN THE GWC June 2011 2 / 6 INTRODUCTION This market survey has focused on how the economic

More information

DECEMBER 2015 HALF YEAR RESULTS BRANDED SALES DRIVES PROFIT UP BY 80% 24 th February 2016

DECEMBER 2015 HALF YEAR RESULTS BRANDED SALES DRIVES PROFIT UP BY 80% 24 th February 2016 DECEMBER 2015 HALF YEAR RESULTS BRANDED SALES DRIVES PROFIT UP BY 80% 24 th February 2016 Disclaimer The information in this presentation is general advice, given in good faith and derived from sources

More information

Napa County Planning Commission Board Agenda Letter

Napa County Planning Commission Board Agenda Letter Agenda Date: 7/1/2015 Agenda Placement: 10A Continued From: May 20, 2015 Napa County Planning Commission Board Agenda Letter TO: FROM: Napa County Planning Commission John McDowell for David Morrison -

More information

Supporting Development of Business Networks and Clusters in Georgia. GIZ SME Development and DCFTA in Georgia Project

Supporting Development of Business Networks and Clusters in Georgia. GIZ SME Development and DCFTA in Georgia Project Supporting Development of Business Networks and Clusters in Georgia GIZ SME Development and DCFTA in Georgia Project 24.10.2016 Project Overview Overall Context EU4BUsiness Framework EU action Support

More information